The State of the Union: Black Entertainment Television 2010- 2020

TV has experienced something of a Black renaissance in the past ten to fifteen years. Its not perfect, but it is pretty darn good. For every questionable depiction of Blackness, there’s at least a couple of good shows, that get it right, or is at least trying to get it right, and in the last three years television shows which prominently feature Blackness, as a subject, have exploded into American mainstream consciousness. iI is a relief to note that not all of these are comedies, an area which has had a preponderance of Black shows, however there still needs to be improvement in representation, because there is still too much emphasis on crime and criminality.

Here’s a list of the most prominent shows with all Black casts, major Black characters, and /or creators and writers. This is not a complete list, and its possible you may not find your personal favorite here, but I tried to be as thorough as possible. The Starred shows are the ones I am watching or have watched. I did not include reality shows or talk shows, as I don’t watch any of them, and know nothing at all about them. For the record, though, just because a show doesn’t have a * doesn’t mean I know nothing at all about it. I try to keep track of as many Black shows as my mind can keep up with, so I end up knowing at least a little bit about a show, even if its just the show’s premise.

Some of these shows are still on the air, some are in their first seasons, others in the second and third seasons. At least a couple have been canceled, while others concluded their run as their creators moved on to new projects.

*Atlanta – Now entering its third season.

Underground – Canceled

*The Watchmen – Will only have one season.

*Raising Dion – Will be returning with a second season

*Desus & Mero – Still on the air

Queen Sugar – Still on the air

*Key and Peele – Finished its run.

*Black Lady Sketch Show – Just finished its first season.

Scandal – Finished its run of seven years.

The Game

Dear White People – Aired on Netflix

The Boondocks – Finished its run

*American Gods: Season One – Readying for its third season, has run into some major issues.

How to Get Away With Murder – Has been renewed for a sixth season.

*Black Lightning  – Now in its third season, airing on the CW.

Power – Aired on the Starz network for six seasons.

Claws – Has been renewed for a fourth and final season.

Being Mary Jane

Insecure 

Orange Is The New Black

The Haves and the Have-Nots

Black*Ish

Empire

This is Us

*Pose – The only show which prominently stars actors and characters who are are transgender. Airs on FX Network

All American

Snowfall

The Chi

*The Get Up – Now canceled. Airing on Netflix.

*Random Acts of Flyness 

Dear White People

The Last OG

Greenleaf

She’s Gotta have it

*Cannon Busters  – Airing on Netflix, futuristicanime with an entirely Black cast.

 

I  “cut the cord” and no longer have any cable channels. However, I do have a Firestick, and know how to torrent. What that means is that I know longer watch shows as they air, and only watch them whenever I remember that they aired. This not changes the output of when I talk about a show, but what shows I will be talking about.

 

Next Week Hiatus

I won’t be doing my usual weekend reading post. I’m taking a bit of time off until next week so I can work on my long form posts. I’ve got about 5 or 6 long form posts Ive been working on for the past month, and life (illness) and work (full-time) keeps interrupting my publishing of them.

I have been watching what shows I can, when I can . I watched some episodes of Iron Fist, but was ultimately disappointed, despite actually liking a couple of episodes. I’ll have more on why later. I watched The Mayans, which wasn’t bad, but didn’t hold my interest much. I generally do not watch crime shows involving PoC, and it’s about Mexican bikers, so I kind of knew I wasn’t going to fall in love with it, but I didn’t hate it either. I just watched an episode of some show on HBO, called Random Flyness, which was really, really weird, unabashedly Black, and kinda soothing, like a freeform version of the show Atlanta crossed with an episode of Key and Peele. I want to write about that.

I’m most excited about American Horror Story Apocalypse. I did watch the first episode and I have a lot to say about it. I don’t know that I’ll post a review every week on it but that first episode deserves its own post so I’m starting work on that.

Right now I’m working on a post about landscape as an essential narrative element, and my highly ambitious second and third posts about White Male Pandering in Entertainment, along with a couple of review anthologies where I write about multiple shows.

Since the racist cartoon of Serena Williams was released, and the man who drew it claimed to know so little about a profession in which he fully takes part, I’m thinking of doing a post on the history of racist caricature, to explain exactly why what he did was racist as fuck to anyone who knows anything on the subject, and even a few who don’t. Beyond the drawing itself, I’m livid at the idea that this man claims to know nothing of the history of his craft of political cartooning.

I’m an artist. I’ve been a visual artist since I was a pre-teen. I was considered a talented draftsman, and even won local awards for my skills. I’m no cartoonist but even I know enough about the history of political cartooning that I would know a racist caricature if I drew it. I made it a point to learn about the history of my craft and improve, improve, improve. You cannot improve in your craft if you don’t know the history of it. I’m incensed because the man is being lazy and stupid (or just lying) about what he did. Either reason is equally shameful, and I have something to say about that, not just as a Black woman, who felt incredibly attacked by that image, but as an artist as well. Here are some other people who felt some kind of way about what happened:

https://www.cnn.com/2018/09/11/opinions/racist-serena-cartoon-mark-knight-rebecca-wanzo/index.html

 

This article may sit behind a paywall so be aware. Some of it is about the racial history of Australia, and how these images of Black people have contributed and enabled racism in Australia and the US..

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/global-opinions/wp/2018/09/12/what-the-herald-suns-serena-williams-cartoon-reveals-about-australias-racial-history/

 

Warning: This website is an archive of racist cartoons. I wanted to add this for informational  purposes, for those who haven’t really seen such images before, and you can contrast and compare the image in the Australian newspaper, to the historical caricatures of Black women.

The two articles above reference some of the Australian imagery like “The Golliwog”, and the Jim Crow Museum has images of this doll on the site. It also discusses the racial history of Australia, and why and how the doll was created.

There is also a drop down menu under The Museum, which goes into the details behind many of the images, what the various images are called, and the history of their creation, like The Mammy, The Jezebel, and the Black Brute.

https://ferris.edu/jimcrow/cartoons/

 

 

TA Ta until next week.

A Black Buffy the Vampire Slayer

 

Well, some of you may have heard about this:

‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer’ Is Getting a Reboot With a Black Lead

https://www.thedailybeast.com/buffy-the-vampire-slayer-is-getting-a-reboot-with-a-black-lead

 

https://the-orbit.net/progpub/2018/07/22/buffy-is-coming-back-and-this-time-shes-going-to-be-black/

I also am not loving the idea of naming a Black woman ‘Buffy’. I’ve got to be honest, on top of the fact that ‘Buffy’ has been played by 2 wyte actresses, ‘Buffy’ as a name is white coded. It doesn’t scream blackness. It screams pretty much what all other corners of USAmerican society screams: whiteness. That kinda solidifies the idea that ‘Buffy’ is a wyte name. On the other hand, if it’s going to be a reboot, they kinda need that name (although it could be a nickname, perhaps one based on athleticism).

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So far, a lot of the reactions have been mixed. Or rather,  the reasons for their negative reactions have been mixed, while the positive reactions are pretty much just  “Yay! New Buffy stories!” My feelings are completely mixed. I don’t know if I should feel happy about it or be annoyed.

I was a huge fan of the original. I think I commented on one of these that I used to watch Buffy like it was a religious experience. Some writers on the subject have distilled this feeling to its essence: For some people, it’s Star Wars, but for some of us, it was Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I was a minor fan of Star Wars. I like it,  for the most part,  but it doesn’t (didn’t) move me the way Buffy did. And something about the time period in which I saw it, (just a few years out of high school) may have played a large part in my reaction to it.

As much as I liked Buffy though, the show does have some major issues, one of which was the subject of race.

https://theconversation.com/a-revamped-buffy-could-rectify-the-original-slayers-problem-with-race-100599

Not to be deterred, however, producers of the show have responded by implying that the new season will not be a reboot with a Buffy who happens to be black, but rather a sequel to the old one, featuring a different slayer altogether. A sequel featuring a different slayer, with her own identity, would be a firm step towards a more radically inclusive and irrevocably transformed storytelling venture.

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I loved Buffy but I’m not necessarily looking forward to a reboot of Buffy because, as this article states, Black fans deserve their own characters, rather than hand me down characters of White shows. On the other hand, I have heard competing ideas of what the show is about. I’ve heard it’s a reboot, but then later I read that this will be a unique character, with her own stories, and that it is a sequel built on the old series. The character’s name will still be Buffy, however, and I think that’s a mistake. If its a reboot, then it’s unnecessary, and if it’s a  sequel to the original, and its a whole new character, then why bother to give her Buffy’s name. Not to mention that there’s not a Black woman on Earth whose name is Buffy. A nickname I could understand but her actual name? No!

I do feel that having a Black woman writer as the showrunner is a good idea because who knows more about what it’s like to be a Black woman, than a Black woman. Certainly not Joss Whedon, whose writing of Black women is, simply, atrocious.

This writer is right in saying that Black people have a wealth of fantasy stories that we’ve created, that we would like to see brought to television, although in an ideal world, I would love  ALL the stories along with the new Buffy.

https://www.slashfilm.com/buffy-reboot-problems/

What’s insulting is the thought that we’re supposed to be happy with whatever representation we get, without understanding that what we crave and demand goes far beyond the simple presence of a person of color on screen. It’s about substance. It’s about the opportunity for an actor or actress of color to be able to stand on their own merit and not in the shadows of their white predecessor. It’s about the importance of highlighting original stories by and featuring talent of color — without presenting it through a white gaze.

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Some people flat out don’t want the new show. There are shows I’d prefer to see ,and stories I’d prefer be told, but I’m not actually opposed to this show. As I’ve said before, I’m incredibly nosy, so no matter what gets put on the air, I’m probably going to watch at least the first episode. I’m not prepared to hate it right away, but I am giving the whole idea  the side-eye.

https://www.themarysue.com/i-dont-want-a-black-buffy/

That’s why I wish, ultimately, that this and even the upcoming Charmed series were original concepts and not hopping on top of existing franchises in order to make them work. Black and non-white creators have our own vampire series that could be up for adaptation. There’s L.A. Banks with The Vampire Huntress Legend, Octavia Butler’s Fledgling(if it loses the age issues), and The Gilda Stories by Jewelle Gomes, which is about a bisexual vampire from the 1850s.

Image result for black fantasy books One of my favorites, that Id love to see adapted to TV is the Maurice Broaddus Joint :Knights of Breton Court, which is a retelling of the legend of King Arthur, set in the hood, with magical characters, and sword-bearing street thugs. There’s nothing like it on TV, right now, and this story deserves to be seen.

 

Image result for coyote kings of the space age This is another one of the unique stories I would love to see brought to TV. Coyote Kings of the Space Age Bachelor Pad is kind of indescribable, although I suppose it would be called the Black version of Ready Player One, if it took place in the show Atlanta.

And here’s a few more:

https://littlefoxandreads.wordpress.com/2017/01/24/diversity-in-sff-1-sci-fi-fantasy-books-with-black-protagonists/

For The Weekend: On Diversity

 

Criticism

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*This is an idea, that I spoke about some time ago, that is slowly starting to gain some traction, after it was widely dispersed that the vast majority of film critics are White men, and after the actresses of Oceans 8 spoke out on why they felt their movie received lukewarm reviews. I have been saying that we need more reviewers of color because more and more movies, books, and TV shows are being released that are not specifically created for White audiences, and I think it’s important that we hear from reviewers who are members of the audiences at which this type of media is aimed, not just White men.

https://variety.com/video/brie-larson-crystal-lucy-awards-critics/

 “[Audiences] are not allowed enough chances to read public discourse on these films by the people that the films were made for. I do not need a 40-year-old white dude to tell me what didn’t work for him about ‘[A] Wrinkle in Time.’ It wasn’t made for him. I want to know what it meant to women of color, to biracial women, to teen women of color, to teens that are biracial.”

Black Mirror and Critical Diversity

https://tvgeekingout.wordpress.com/2018/01/10/black-mirror-and-critical-diversity/

The Problem with White Critics

https://wordpress.com/post/tvgeekingout.wordpress.com/73012

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See I think A Wrinkle in Time just proves we need more female critics and more critics of color because…okay, let me see if I can explain this.

I saw the latest Blade Runner movie and I was bored to tears yet on the movies subreddit, everyone said I either didn’t get it or didn’t give the movie a chance. And when I gave my reasons as to why I didn’t like the movie, I was called close-minded. The movie wasn’t just dull but it had this creepy obsession with women yet didn’t respect women in any way and I found it ironic that a movie all about women and their rights to reproduce had the main character be a male. But obviously, I’m not smart enough to understand this movie.

Now with Wrinkle in Time, I enjoyed this movie and I do honestly feel like a lot of white, male critics are tearing the movie apart because they don’t get it or don’t try to get it. There is also a lot of callous talk concerning this movie.

“Oh, it’s too emotional! It’s too focused on self love!”

How…how are those bad things!?

Like I’m sorry but I am tired of every movie that is dark and gritty being hailed as something thought provoking and deep. Not every single piece of entertainment has to be depressing 24/7. I’ve also noticed that when it comes to movies that are dumb fun, if it doesn’t feature a man, it’s torn apart too. I liked Maleficent. It’s fun but if I like it, I’m an idiot apparently.

What I’m getting to is this. The job of the critic is to tell people if they would like a piece of media or if they would enjoy it. I’m able to see a movie and sometimes say, “This movie was not meant for me but someone else might like it.” I feel like a vast majority of today’s critics can’t do that and I think it’s important that critics be made up of more than just white dudes.

 

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Image result for film criticism/brie larson

*In some ways I agree with the following article. But my point is not that straight, white, 40 year old, men don’t have anything at all to say about films not aimed at them, like A Wrinkle In Time, (which is aimed at bi-racial teenage girls), but that they don’t have anything, of real authentic relevance, to say to any of the bi-racial teenage girls who are going to see the movie, or read the reviews. As a straight white man, there are certain aspects of authenticity, in a movie not aimed at him, that he’s simply not going  to see, and therefor speak about, and his viewpoint shouldn’t be the only one expressed about a film.

This isn’t about whether or not a movie is good or bad, or whether or not White men can  see a movie. Movies are meant to be seen, and are for whoever will go see them, but a bi-racial teenager may have specific insights into A Wrinkle In Time, which is directly aimed at her as its audience. What did she get out it? Did the movie accomplish its goal for her?

We need more diverse film critics because I do want to know what someone of Mexican descent thinks about Coco,  what women think about Wonder Woman, and what a Black person thinks of Black Panther and Luke Cage. Its not that white men have no insight about movies they are not the audience for, but that their insight might be somewhat limited, because they’re not part of the group, or culture.

At the same time I can also acknowledge there are plenty of movies that are aimed at straight, White guys, that they may have insight into, that I just don’t have, like Fight Club, and Taxi Driver. I’ve seen those movies, and can comment on them from a film school essay point of view, but I’m not a a part of the group those films are specifically aimed at. There are things about being a straight White guy that I just don’t know about. I can see the thematic aspects of those movies, but I can’t say a whole lot about their authenticity, and what messages I get from them may be completely different than what the creator intended, (although arguably, I can probably do a better job of it, than any white guy, on movies aimed at women, black people, and Latinx).

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-et-mn-film-criticism-diversity-20180620-htmlstory.html

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Publishing:

Image result for diversity/publishing/penguin books

Last year, an author named Lionel Shriver went on a public rant about diversity in publishing. She has since doubled down on her views, which has prompted a scathing response form the author, Hanif Kureishi. And once again this backlash against diversity in publishing is entirely predictable, according to Samuel R. Delaney, (and can also be applied to many areas of media that seek to branch out to different audiences). I will reprint this link as many times as I have to to make my point:

http://www.nyrsf.com/racism-and-science-fiction-.html

As long as there are only one, two, or a handful of us, however, I presume in a field such as science fiction, where many of its writers come out of the liberal-Jewish tradition, prejudice will most likely remain a slight force—until, say, black writers start to number thirteen, fifteen, twenty percent of the total. At that point, where the competition might be perceived as having some economic heft, chances are we will have as much racism and prejudice here as in any other field.

Penguin’s response:

:https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/penguin-publishers-diversity-inclusion-scheme-writers-queer-lgbtq-race-class-disability-women-a8393796.html

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/jun/11/publisher-defends-diversity-drive-after-lionel-shrivers-attack

 

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Kureishi’s response:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jun/15/diversity-publishing-culture-minority-writers-penguin

The British creativity I grew up with – in pop, fashion, poetry, the visual arts and the novel – has almost always come from outside the mainstream: from clubs, gay subcultures, the working class and from the street. Many of the instigators may have been white, but they were not from the middle class – a class that lacks, in my experience, the imagination, fearlessness and talent to be truly subversive.

 

Movies

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*An article on how the current crop of horror movies  are a reflection of America’s greatest fears, and always have been. I spoke on this briefly, when I reviewed the Bodysnatchers movies, and how each iteration was a reflection of America’s greatest fears, during the time in which they were made. 

https://tvgeekingout.wordpress.com/2018/01/10/invasion-of-the-body-snatchers-1956-vs-all-the-rest/

https://www.vox.com/culture/2016/12/21/13737476/horror-movies-2016-invasion

https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/04/why-sci-fi-keeps-imagining-the-enslavement-of-white-people/361173/

But it’s worth remembering that in sci-fi, the future actually isn’t safe or sterile at all. On the contrary, with its alien invasions, evil empires, authoritarian dystopia, and new lands discovered and pacified, the genre can look as much like the past as the future. In particular, sci-fi is often obsessed with colonialism and imperial adventure, the kind that made the British Empire an empire and that still sustains America’s might worldwide.

TV

Image result for brooklyn 99/propaganda

There was a long discussion, on Tumblr,  of what constitutes police propaganda, because some people were confused, and wanted to disregard Brooklyn 99 as propaganda, based solely on the idea that  the show was progressive and enjoyable. My argument, and the argument of many others was, this is exactly the reasons why the show is a form of  propaganda for law enforcement.  My argument was that it was the impact of the show, and not the writers intentions which make it propaganda.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2015/05/18/brooklyn_nine_nine_s_fantasy_world_doesn_t_stop_me_from_loving_it_video.html

 It’s a well-crafted fantasy, with hardly any discernible connection to current cultural attitudes about law enforcement. On the surface, the show is really not so different from that subway ad. Does the fact that I love one and feel displeasure for the other make me a hypocrite?

@adhighdefinition

I don’t want to be That Person ™ who adds meaningless noise to discourse, but…

Who in the world thinks that B99 is police propaganda?

Police propaganda is shows like SWAT (which I enjoy immensely, except for the preachiness) or Blue Bloods or NCIS LA, in which law enforcement is glorified and the main characters can do no harm.

B99 focuses on cops, yes, and addresses cop-related issues, yes. But it never portrays policing as anything other than a normal profession, or the characters as more moral than anyone else. You could change the setting to an amusement park or a college or a law firm and the basic setup would stay the same.

Recently in B99, Jake tells Captain Holt that he’s not ready to come back to work, because he has a “little voice in his head saying, ‘but what if [the suspect] innocent’.” And Holt tells him that the voice is a strength. Jake shouldn’t think lightly of throwing people behind bars or accusing them of crimes. It’s a serious matter. “I wish more cops thought that way,” says Holt.

HOW IS THAT PROPAGANDA????

 

Actually the argument you just made for why it isn’t propaganda is exactly why the show is propaganda The series does not show the Brooklyn 99 crew as just regular citizens. The main characters are glorified as being more progressive than the police actually are,  occasionally shown to do no wrong, and when they do wrong, they  correct their mistakes by the end of an episode.

So it actually is. Don’t get me wrong, I absolutely love this show and all it’s characters, but that’s what makes it propaganda. Any cop show that is set up for you to think of the characters as likable, dutiful, and most importantly “good” is propaganda. I think the creators  intent is to be funny, with great characters, and tackle a couple of  social issues, but it is still propaganda, not because, not just because of their intent, but because of the effect of the series in this particular social landscape.

The “effect” is that you end up liking these very liberal, open minded, “woke” cops,  and in real life, cops are generally very conservative. Also, the police are employees of the state, so ANY show that makes us feel some type of way about them (good or bad) automatically makes the show (even unintentionally) political, making it propaganda.

So yes, as wonderful and lovable as the characters are, as nice as they are,   that is the reason that it qualifies as propaganda. Technically, even if all the cops on the show were evil and corrupt, it would still be propaganda, because the net “effect” is that you watch this show, and feel some type of way about the state-run, political entity of law enforcement.  The side effect is that the show makes the police look good, and makes you feel good about them.

Just because it’s a comedy doesn’t mean it doesn’t have an effect on the net accumulation  of people’s thinking about the police. In the end ,it’s not about the “intention” of the creators. It’s about the “effect” the show has in the landscape of television, along with the 15-20 other cop shows airing at the time.

Brooklyn 99 qualifies.

 

Source:

Fandom

Image result for racism in fandom

Once again, we need to discuss the racism that has heavily infested the fandom. Why? Because its  merely a reflection of the everyday microaggressions and racism that White people practice on the daily. I’m also going to argue that this racism is informed by decades of television viewing in which White audiences were never given any alternative narratives about PoC, women, and gender, and sexual orientation.

https://fanlore.org/wiki/Race_and_Fandom#Racism_in_Slash_Fandom

Race and ethnicity has been an issue in the canons of fannish source texts for almost as long as fandom has been around. Because most entertainment is created and produced by white males, particularly in Hollywood, it tends to reflect the mindset and experiences of the majority of its creators.

 

http://www.blackenterprise.com/the-power-of-black-women-in-fandom/

As a black women who are fans of black female characters, we are constantly reminded how much hate there is for black women and how voraciously people in fandoms dig for reasons to justify it. Oftentimes white female characters are lauded for doing the same things that white fan bases hate black female characters for.

http://www.vulture.com/2018/06/kelly-marie-tran-star-wars-hollywood-enabled-toxicity.html

The lack of ethnic and gender diversity in the first three films is an original sin that allows toxic fans to point to the Original Trilogy the way gun nuts point to the Second Amendment. There’s no productive argument to be had when anti-inclusivity extremism is at play. These people want what they want, and they’re not disappearing.

 

Weekend Reading (On Gender And Race)

Here’s a roundup of some of the articles I’ve been  reading about gender related issues regarding Race and Intersectionality. 

*The first one is about how oppressed people are required to do the emotional labor of teaching their oppressors what oppression is, and  how not to do that.

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https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/politics/a19480416/women-changing-mens-minds-feminism-steven-crowder/

Audre Lorde perhaps put this best when she wrote, “Black and Third World people are expected to educate white people as to our humanity. Women are expected to educate men. Lesbians and gay men are expected to educate the heterosexual world. The oppressors maintain their position and evade their responsibility for their own actions. There is a constant drain of energy which might be better used in redefining ourselves and devising realistic scenarios for altering the present and constructing the future.”

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*On how movies about Black pain are only viewed by White audiences as a substitute for the actual work of eliminating White Supremacy, and how Black lives would be better served, if we stopped using up all our energy on appealing to White people to actually care about their fellow human beings.

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http://blackyouthproject.com/the-stories-of-our-struggles-are-not-for-white-people-to-consume-in-an-effort-to-do-better/

Think of all the possibilities that exist should we invest in one another and divest entirely from the practice of curating white “empathy”

-@arielle_newton

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  *Feminism is not about liking other women, and supporting  their bullshit, no matter what. That’s not the definition. If you call yourself a feminist and you hold some shitty non-intersectional views, or are just a moron, you’re going to get called on it.
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Because feminism does not dictate that you are required to like every stupid woman you encounter. Feminism isn’t a hot air balloon designed to lift already privileged ladies to new joyful heights. Those women are thinking of “girl power” or “bootyliciousness” or “domestic feminism”—some other term that was intended to act as a milquetoast substitute for actual feminism.

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*In this review of Get Out, the author discuses Black people’s reactions to  danger in movies, vs White people’s reactions to the danger.

 

Well, Too Bad We Can’t Stay

As I write this review, it has been five years since the horrific and cold-blooded murder of Trayvon Martin. When a car ominously pulls up alongside André and stops, we — people of color and horror fans — collectively hold our breath because we recognize the signal for danger. But for white audiences, that frisson is the delicious fear of the unknown. For POC, it’s precisely the opposite — the threat we see is all too well-known. It’s for that reason that Andre’s abrupt turnaround with a “No. Not today. You know how they be doing motherfuckers out here!” is so satisfying.

 

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*Til this point, I have largely been ignoring The Purge films ,because the first movie was such a poorly executed idea, that I couldn’t get past that. But now, the movies are starting to explicitly address the gender, class, and racial issues that I found dis-satisfyingly absent from that first movie.

In The First Purge we are given the racialialized backstory of the first three movies. The Purge movies turn out to be  not so much about purging society’s urge to commit evil, as it is about rich White people purging society of  marginalized  people.

Here, in this review of The Purge Anarchy, some of the details of this world are fleshed out a bit more, and they are, quite frankly, horrifying.

http://efbresearch.blogspot.com/2014/08/race-and-class-in-purge-anarchy.html

Both of these scenes highlight for me the interrelationship between class and race and the exploitative powers of a system that only reifies the lasting order and undervalues the lives of poor and minority bodies. In this film, both the rich and the government specifically target and kill blacks, the homeless, deviants, and youth in an attempt to eradicate and “purge” the society of perceived evils. This movie asks us all to reflect on who is in power, what oppressive acts are they committing, and who does society really serve. Both the murderers and the white families who can afford to lock up and hide are complicit in the exploitation and eradication of people deemed unworthy of life… Who gets to define who is worthy of life? Who gets to define how punishment is laid out? Who is in control of our streets, our livelihoods, our identities as targets or as civilians?

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  *The abuse of Asian women in popular media continues. I really enjoyed Guardians of the Galaxy 2 , a lot, but what I couldn’t get behind, was the treatment of Mantis. It was just wrong. I know the writers thought it was funny, but that’s how I know there were no Asian people in the writing room, because they would have pointed out what the constant abuse, of this stereotypically submissive Asian woman, looked like. for the record,  I loved the character, because she’s just really sweet, but her treatment by the other characters made me very, very, uncomfortable.  
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 There are also other issues with how Asians are portrayed in media. First, if seen at all, Asian characters are almost either Chinese, Japanese, Korean, or Indian. There are forty-eight different countries in Asia, so it is unfair and inaccurate to assume that all Asians are east Asians or Indian. Next, as Thai-American actor Pun Bandhu stated about Asian characters portrayed, “We’re the information givers. We’re the geeks. We’re the prostitutes. We’re so sick and tired of seeing ourselves in those roles.” Asians are associated with certain roles, so as a result, it is very hard to see change in the roles Asians play.
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There is no nuanced relationship between Ego and Mantis — just a master who demands his servant ease his pain of loneliness by helping him fall asleep. She dutifully does as she’s asked, because she does not know that there is another way of life.
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Mantis’s journey to joining the Guardians can be credited mostly to her “friendship” with a character who takes advantage of her innocence. Although Drax protects her from physical harm and Mantis helps Drax to access his buried pain about his lost wife and children, it isn’t enough to lessen the impact of his verbal abuse. Mantis’s past is a blank slate: She is an orphan, possibly the last survivor of her race, trained to be the companion and servant of Ego…Ego’s evil “expansion” plan is imperialistic, only adding to the subtext that Mantis is a colonized figure and one of his first casualties. She is educated by him, molded into, as she puts it, “a flea with a purpose.” Much of her character in the film is centered around her subordination; even though part of her storyline is breaking free from Ego’s control, that her friendship with Drax—the relationship that incites her rebellion against Ego—is built upon him insulting her isn’t much healthier.

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*Another invisible thing in movies, is how different types of characters talk, and what they talk about, based on race. I thought this article was fascinating, and I’m surprised that someone tracked this, because it never occurred to me that characters of different races talk about different things, and that what they talk about adheres so closely to stereotypes about that race!

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They found that the language used by female characters tended to be more positive, emotional and related to family values, while the language used by male characters was more closely linked to achievement. African-American characters were more likely to use swear words, and Latino characters were more apt to use words related to sexuality. Older characters, meanwhile, were more likely to discuss religion.

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*I’m a little dubious about reading this book because I don’t know if WoC will be characters, and how they’ll be treated. Since this book is written by a White woman, I’m  pretty sure that the treatment of men of color, by White women, who now have the power to harm them, is not going to be addressed, and for some reason that makes me very nervous about reading it.

White authors have a very long history of not addressing White racial resentment, or including it as a factor, in  fantasy and science fiction narratives. White feminists generally never mention it at all. This book references male oppression but White feminism refuse to acknowledge that men of color are not the ones oppressing White women, and in fact it is White women who already hold the power in that dynamic. I’m also certain that the point of view of Black women (who actually are oppressed by men of color) won’t be addressed either.

From the many reviews I’ve read, the book does address power imbalances, and how the women who are now in potions of power, simply replicate the old power dynamics that men created, bullying, torturing, and killing others. It is not mentioned if the women fight among themselves, since women are not a monolith, and even now, there are women who will fight to uphold  patriarchal systems. I do not know if transgender women, (or people who identify as non-binary) are taken into account in the story.

http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/02/26/imagining-violence-the-power-of-feminist-fantasy/

Rage and the desire for revenge against male oppressors, however, has emerged in women’s dystopian writing during periods of feminist protest and uprising. We can see it during the first wave of the suffrage movement. Inez Haynes Gillmore, an American writer and suffragist, wrote, “When the first militant in England threw the first brick my heart flew with it. Thereafter I was a firm believer in militant tactics.” In principle, Gillmore believed, militant women should use the actions that had always worked for men: “rebellion and violence.” Yet she was also thinking about suicide as a suffragist tactic in practice:

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http://blackyouthproject.com/feminist-triumph-action-thrillers-always-white-women/

Here we are now, in the wake of Wonder Woman, and we find ourselves amidst these familiar conversations once again, and once again we are reminded that feminist realizations in major U.S. action films thus far have largely been for and about white women…

…And the ease with which Wonder Woman fans are able to ignore healthy critiques of the film and its star reflects how mainstream feminism and feminist solidarity have always been for and about white women.

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*I’m a big fan of Kim Coles, both as an actress and a comedian, and it was a lot of fun to read this interview, so many years after her star turn in the show Living Single.

https://theundefeated.com/features/90s-token-black-actors-phil-morris-bianca-lawson-kim-coles/

… in the 1990s, the wealth of black representation on television could lull you into thinking (if you turned the channel from Rodney King taking more than 50 blows from Los Angeles Police Department batons) that black lives actually did matter. But almost all of these shows were, in varying ways, an extension of segregated America. It’s there in the memories of the stars below: There were “black shows” and there were “white shows.” If you were a black actor appearing on a white show, you were usually alone.

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https://www.harpersbazaar.com/culture/film-tv/a12022020/how-women-of-color-portrayed-tv-film/

A diverse writers’ rooms matter as much as the show’s cast. It is imperative that we continue to critique both the shows and movies we love until they properly reflect the world we are living in—and the people who live in this world. The fictional characters I love shouldn’t have to eclipse their sun to shine.

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*The styles of oppression and stereotype faced by White and Black women are just different. so we require different ways of addressing them.

https://thenerdsofcolor.org/2016/09/26/why-it-matters-when-women-of-color-play-love-interests/

Women of color have emphatically not been flooded with images of being treated as princesses and beloved love interests. The emotionally resilient, invulnerable, no-nonsense woman is all we are often allowed to be in media. We’re used to seeing roles where the women of color are expected to stare death and torment in the face with nary a single tear shed. We’re used to being expected to shoulder some great burden with no complaint. We often see ourselves play stoic bodyguards, hardened leaders, and calculating assassins who will do whatever it takes to survive. Rarely do women of color — particularly Black women — get to see themselves portrayed as precious, beautiful, and in need of protection. Rarely do we see films where we aren’t automatically expected to save ourselves.

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*Michael Burnham, of Star Trek Discovery, has become my new favorite hero.

https://mediadiversified.org/2018/03/06/normalising-black-women-as-heroes-star-trek-discovery-as-groundbreaking/

Discovery normalizes a black female hero in space. Evading the extremes of paragon and pariah, the show gives us a nuanced figure and places her at the very centre of the story. Few SF shows have ever tried to do this. The only example that comes to mind is the short-lived Extant, which also aired on CBS. But Extant was never really a space show and it never gained traction with audiences. So until Discovery came along, the primary model for black women in space (even empowered black women) was a sidekick. Shows like Doctor Who, Firefly, and Battlestar Galactica include wonderful black female characters but always as secondary players. By casting a black woman as the lead, Discovery is unprecedented in the Star Trek franchise and extraordinary for SF television.

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*An interview with the Author of Where No Black Woman Has Gone Before, discussing how WoC are treated in science fiction media.

As an associate professor of English at Denison University, Diana Adesola Mafe makes her stride in the resistance where she teaches courses in postcolonial, gender, and Black studies. Her newest published endeavor is described to include “in-depth explorations of six contemporary American and British films and shows, this pioneering volume spotlights Black female characters who play central, subversive roles in science fiction, fantasy, and horror.” We were able to steal her away for a moment from her busy schedule where she is currently teaching a few classes to pick her brain about Where No Black Woman Has Gone Before and how it came to be.

Black Nerd Problems: Diana, thank you so much for making time in your busy schedule for us! First things first, presentation is everything. I love the book cover art and the title! The cover features a Black woman in a sci-fi type setting, centered in the middle of it all. I’m a visual learner so this image speaks to me before I even read a single page. Centering a Black woman is a very deliberate step in analyzing different collective portrayals of Black women especially when we are subjected to not being a leading lady in many mainstream projects. And it doesn’t go over my head that she’s a beautiful dark skinned Black woman, as European beauty standards have really amped up colorism. What input did you have on your cover and why was imperative to have imagery that aligns with who you are and your book’s content?

Diana Mafe: I’m so glad you mention the book cover! Despite the old adage about not judging books by their covers, book covers are an entry point to a text (much like titles) and they can send a powerful message even before you flip to the first page. I’m pleased to say that I had considerable input on the cover, which speaks to the flexibility of the University of Texas Press. I chose the image and filled out a questionnaire that allowed me to weigh in on things like design and color.

I remember spending several afternoons and evenings combing through online images in an attempt to find something that captured the spirit of the book. This meant doing keyword searches by combining terms like “Black women,” “science fiction,” “space,” “superhero,” “Afrofuturism,” and so on. Eventually, I happened upon a photograph of a black female Iron Man as portrayed by the Liberian model Deddeh Howard. As soon as I saw it, I thought, that’s it—that’s the cover. Having a Black woman literally front and center is important because that, in many ways, is the point of the book. To do otherwise would (ironically) perpetuate the very erasure of black women that I’m trying to interrogate.

BNP: I’m also very much in my fangirl feels because I’m assuming your title, “Where No Black Woman Has Gone Before” is a nod to Star Trek’s “Where No Man Has Gone Before”. Granted your introduction is titled, “To Boldly Go” and you mention Nichelle Nichol’s pioneering Lt. Uhura as one of few early gateway representations of Black women.

I think this is totally appropriate as stunningly revolutionary as her presence was (and how rightfully she is an icon), I love how you also dig in deeper critically and mention the shortcomings of Star Trek to her character. In your final chapter, you dutifully return to Uhura’s more recent portrayal in the rebooted Star Trekfilms. I really like how you come back to speaking about the male gaze regarding Uhura, especially in her newer portrayal. How do you think this critique can serve as food for thought for Uhura’s next portrayal in the future whenever that happens?

 

DM: Your assumption about the title is correct—a definite nod to Star Trek. The same goes for subtitles like “To Boldly Go” and “Final Frontiers.” Because Nichelle Nichols’s Uhura is such a pioneering figure, the first Black female science fiction icon, it was appropriate to begin and end the book with her character. And since she has been rebooted in the new millennium, her character offers some insight into how far we have come in terms of black female representation onscreen.

But as I discuss in the book’s conclusion, the “new” Uhura (Zoe Saldana) is not especially radical. The Eurocentrism and phallocentrism of the original show carries over into the reboots. Of course, there are understandable limits to rebooting classic science fiction television and cinema—if you change the original too much, it becomes unrecognizable and thus defeats the point. So along with returning to and revamping classic narratives that we love, we also need to continue imagining entirely new narratives in which old molds are not merely stretched but broken.

For Uhura, that means more screen time, more dialogue, and more agency. The key is to preserve this beloved Black female character without also preserving her constraints. At the same time, it’s vital that shows like Star Trek create fresh characters. Here, the franchise has made a “giant leap for Black womankind” (I couldn’t resist one last space cliché) by debuting Star Trek: Discovery, which gives us Michael Burnham (Sonequa Martin-Green), the first Black female lead in Star Trek history.

Read on here[x]

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And just because these are hella cute! Shuri would definitely be Bubbles, while Okoye would be Buttercup.

Adequate Representation & Fandom Racism

 

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I think Samuel R. Delaney really summed this up best when he outlined how the rise in racist behavior from White people in fandoms (and most other ventures and organizations) is often directly commensurate with a rise in the number of PoC who are participating in said event. Not to imply causality here, but certainly there is a correlation.

 

*(Warning for graphic descriptions of lynching.)

“Racism and Science Fiction”
by Samuel R. Delany

From NYRSF Issue 120, August 1998. “Racism in SF” first appeared in volume form
in Darkmatter, edited by Sheree R. Thomas, Warner Books: New York, 2000.
Posted by Permission of Samuel R. Delany. Copyright © 1998 by Samuel R. Delany.


Racism for me has always appeared to be first and foremost a system, largely supported by material and economic conditions at work in a field of social traditions. Thus, though racism is always made manifest through individuals’ decisions, actions, words, and feelings, when we have the luxury of looking at it with the longer view (and we don’t, always), usually I don’t see much point in blaming people personally, white or black, for their feelings or even for their specific actions—as long as they remain this side of the criminal. These are not what stabilize the system. These are not what promote and reproduce the system. These are not the points where the most lasting changes can be introduced to alter the system.

 

http://www.nyrsf.com/racism-and-science-fiction-.html

 

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Delaney was specifically discussing Genre literature in this essay, but this same reasoning could also be applied to television, film, fandoms, tech startups,  travel, medicine, and academia. The reason why so many people like to look back to the “Good ‘Ol Days” and say there wasn’t any racism back then, is because there weren’t enough PoC involved in that particular industry back then, to trigger the “Pushback” behavior we’re seeing now, at least not in enough numbers that White people thought it worrisome.

There isn’t more racism being expressed in fandom. It’s the same amount of whitewashing, erasure, and White prioritization that  has always existed. The only differences now is that with the rise, in number, of fans of color, White bigots have become more  vocal in their efforts to push back against those numbers, and there are more of us to call them out on their behavior.

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Whether they know what they’re doing or not, fans are participating in an effort to drive PoC away from spaces they have always considered safely theirs, and not just against PoC, but women as well. This happens in every industry, and it has always failed.  There has never been a time when White bigots (whether they knew they were bigots, or not) successfully managed to send THOSE people back where they came from, or halt their participation in some cultural pursuit. Nevertheless, each generation of newcomers must go through the same song and dance of defending our presence, wherever we happened to show up, or defending our interest, in something we found entertaining.

And I am a WoC, so I have had to work doubly hard at this.

Things I’ve Been Watching (October 2017)

Here are some of the shows I’ve been looking at this month. There’s a lot of releases, and I can’t keep up with a lot of them, but I’ll watch what I can and get back to you on what I thought about them.

The Gifted Season Premiere

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I’m simply not in the mood for this show, and I’m fed up with this type of plot, now. It’s loosely based on some of the X-Men and New Mutants comic books, in that it has some Sentinel plotline, and some of the characters from those groups. Stephen Moyer stars as a lawyer who used to prosecute mutant criminals, and  the father of two young mutants, now on the run from the government, which is rounding up mutants and imprisoning them in scientific camps.

I tried watching the first episodes, and while I like a couple of the characters, the show is simply not compelling enough to keep me watching it every week. The characters have the usual teenage angst, with superpowers, that made me dislike the First X-Men movie. Blink is a teenager who can teleport by creating portals, and Thunderbird, who is Native American, is a kind of tracker of people and things. I’m dismayed that the show used the Native American tracker stereotype, as that’s nothing like Thunderbird’s actual powers in the books, which consists of speed and strength.

And I’m just not here for yet another plotline of people with superpowers being rounded up and used by the government. This seems to be the only plotline they can come up with for superpowered characters, especially on TV, and once again, there is only the focus on how this affects White, suburban, middle-class families.

Just like with the show Heroes, there is no focus on how the discovery of superpowers would affect any marginalized communities, something I would consider much more entertaining, and which the show Cleverman handled with a certain amount of depth. As I complained about before, we keep getting stories about middle-class White characters being subjected to the same oppressions that have been visited on marginalized communities. This show would have had far more depth and been much more interesting if it had been set in the G/L community,  or the Black and Latinx communities, in which this type of interment is already occurring.

In the forties, the Japanese were rounded up in internment camps because they were considered a danger to the US, and later, authorities used to raid the gay and lesbian communities and lock them in jails with the full force of legal authority behind them. Today, its immigration officials grabbing random Brown people out of their homes, and locking them up on suspicion of being illegal immigrants. What do you want to bet that none of these things will be addressed in yet another show where we see average White people being treated in the same manner?

 

Legends of Tomorrow

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I’m looking forward to this new season. I really enjoyed the season premiere, which was a lot of fun and addressed a couple of cliffhangers from last season. This season will also introduce one of my favorite characters. Constantine.

Constantine’s show was something of a bust, but I think he’ll fit right in on this ensemble show, because he just works better when interacting with other super powered, snarky,  characters, and yes, the writers have promised to keep his canonical bi-sexuality intact, something which was never addressed in his own show.

Also, returning this season is Captain Cold, played by the very candilicious, Wentworth Miller.I always loved his dynamic with Heatwave (yeah, I totally ship those two) and I’m looking forward to the two of them meeting again, especially after Cold sacrificed his life to save the team, in a previous season.

I generally like all the characters on this show. My top favorite is Firestorm. I remember reading those comics as a kid, and briefly again in the 90s. He’s an interesting binary character of an older White man named Stein, and a Black teenager named Jackson, and I love the friendship that has developed between the two of them. The show has managed to carefully avoid the stereotype of the Black brute, who is nothing but the muscle in their relationship, by making Jackson an engineering genius, with Stein as his mentor. so naturally, Stein will be leaving the show later this season. I wonder who Jackson’s new partner will be.

I least like Black Canary, but I think that has more to do with the actress, because I like the version from the comic books just fine.

In the last season, the Legends broke the world by causing a set of time anomalies, which caused them to get kicked out of their spaceship. We open the episode with them leading normal lives on Earth. Black Canary is working, unhappily, in a department store, and Jackson is attending college. Stein appears to be the only happy one, spending time with the daughter he never knew he had, from another timeline. Heatwave, played by Dominic Purcell, is also having the time of his life, vacationing on the beaches of Aruba, before he is attacked by Julius Caesar, another time anomaly.

The team gets called back together to fix the problems they caused with all their time travelling last season. This show airs after The Flash, which is absolutely perfect, since I’m really starting to like The Flash a lot more, and have started regularly watching that.

 

 

Brooklyn 99

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When we last left The 99 last season, Jake and Rosa were sent to prison, for a crime they didn’t commit, by a corrupt cop. When we meet up with them at the beginning of the new season, the two of them are not adjusting well to their situation. Jake’s roommate is a cannibal, played by Tim Meadows, (he is extremely funny), but we don’t get much insight into Rosa’s situation. We spend most of our time with Jake, as he tries not to get outed as a cop by the Warden, who is trying to capture a drug smuggling ring, run by Lou Diamond-Phillips. I liked the guest stars more than I liked Jake in these episodes, and I hope to see more of Lou Diamond’s character in the future. He so rarely gets to do comedies, and I think he’s hilarious here.

Amy and Charles are working hard to find proof that Jake and Rosa were set up and come up with zany schemes to do this, even though Charles thinks his podcast about Jake should be enough to free him. One of the funnier running gags is that he invited Terry on the podcast, but the interview wasn’t successful, and Terry is confused about why.

By the end of the second episode, all is well in the Kingdom of 99, Jake and Amy have been reunited, Charles can give up his podcast, and well, Rosa remains very much Rosa. I normally do not watch shows about cops, (as I consider all of them to be thinly veiled propaganda about the inherent goodness of law enforcement), but I will make an exception for a really great, or funny show, and Brooklyn 99, along with the very politically incorrect Reno 911, are worth the watch.

 

The Exorcist Season Two

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Well, I think its too much to say this is an enjoyable show, because its supposed to be scary, but it does star John Cho as one of the shows leads. The show does have some issues though. I’m not at all interested in the storyline of the two priests who have made off with the possession victim from last season, and the gruff speaking victim gets on my nerves after about thirty seconds, but fortunately her onscreen time can be easily ignored. I just pretend I’m really engrossed in my knitting when she’s on the screen.

John Cho’s storyline is far more interesting, as he stars as the father figure for a home of orphans with severe trauma issues. The home is being visited and assessed for its level of care by an old flame of John’s, so the show is killing it in the Asian representation column, as this role is being played by an actress named Li Jun Li, and I’ve become very invested in their relationship, although I do fear for the life of the young lady, because TV loves to kill off  Asian characters, and that actress isn’t especially well known. The last time we saw Jun Li, she was the coroner from the show Minority Report, and was dressed like a Rave victim.

Well, inconveniently there’s some spooky happenings at the house and the kids are acting up and misbehaving in ways they didn’t before she came there, which increases the tension between her and John’s character as he wonders if she can be fair to him, especially taking into account their dramatic past together.

I’m looking forward to the rest of this season because its so rare to see Asian Americans as stars in a horror show. Actually, this show is pretty good about diversity, and a sensitive portrayal of children with various disabilities. The disabilities are not the source of any of the horror (some outside force is) so that’s another stereotype that’s been upended.  Its not as hysterically over the top as American Horror Story, so I’m able to get caught up in the mystery without getting a headache, and the characters are all mostly likable.

 

The Flash

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I’m just really starting to get into this show. I watched most of last season and understood maybe half of what was happening, but I did like the characters, which is what mostly draws me into a show. My favorite characters are Iris, and Cisco, and I got to see a lot of both of them in the season premiere, although I like all of the characters on the show except Caitlin Snow. That actress acts like she’s in a different show altogether, but she has good chemistry with the other characters, so I can tolerate her.

Can I just say how much I genuinely love Iris. She is by every definition of the term, a  rare flower. She’s gorgeous, graceful, intelligent, and heavily reminds me of Nichelle Nichols version of Uhura, an example of the kind of woman I wanted to be as a child. I hate to say this, because I really like Barry, but she is waaaay too good for him. I also love that Iris is a Black woman, because it’s so rare that Black women get to be loved, sacrificed for, or  damseled in mainstream media, and I am here for it. She also gets some really nice speeches during the episode.

Last season, Barry sacrificed himself to save the love of his every existence, and entered what is known as The Speed Force. I think its the source of his powers or something. I’m not too clear on that. Anyway Cisco comes up with a way to save him, but the Barry that comes back to Earth is deeply confused and unintelligible. The entire situation is complicated by a supposed new enemy, come to challenge Barry, a Samurai with a sword that causes earthquakes. The entire crew needs to save Barry, so he can save the city.

I’m looking forward to this new season as I’ve heard that Ralph Dibney’s Elongated Man will be featured on the show. I used to read  his comics as a kid.  Harrison Wells will be making another appearance, too, along with a character played by Danny Trejo. Katee Sackoff is also supposed to show up as a supervillain, I think. Killer Frost has already put in an appearance in this first episode, and this season is supposed to have a lighter tone than the last, which I think all superhero shows could use a dose of.

So, I’m in, I guess.

 

The Orville

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I’ve been watching this off and on.. Its still rather uneven n tone, but hopefully it will settle down into what it wants to be by the end of the season. Its not a bad show but it wavers between wanting to be a comedy, with some rather juvenile humor, a drama relationship, and a space opera, and these three things while done effectively, are not meshing well with each other. The switches between styles can be jarring and obvious.

Seth McFarlane’s presence does bring in the guest stars, though. We got a Charlize Theron guest shot, and a cameo from Liam Neeson, which was pretty cool. I kinda like most of the characters, but the surprise for me was the ex-wife and  First Officer, played by Adrianne Palicki. Her, and most of the other women, are the  smartest people on the show. Most of the guys are well… kinda weird, and not too bright, but I like them anyway. There’s a metal robot, and an alien with a same sex husband, and so far the show has been very respectful of the two of them, treating them just like any other couple on the ship. I’m not sure this counts as gay representation though, since they’re both aliens from a mono-gendered  planet.

Its not a bad show. Or rather, not as bad as I thought it was going to be because I was a little dubious about McFarlane being on the show and he and I don’t share the same humor. We still don’t, but so far he hasn’t done anything to actually upset me, so I’m inclined to keep watching.

 

American Horror Story

I’ve pretty much stopped watching this. I’m just not in the frame of mind to consider it entertaining right now, even though it may well be for some people.

 

Outlander

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I’m a lot less interested in Claire’s life in the fifties and sixties then I am in her life in the past, which is how this season has begun. In order to raise their chid in safety Claire has gone back to her own time period to raise her little girl. Her current husband has issues with this of course but is willing to wrap his head around the fact that his wife has two very different lives, and that her child is not his. That’s a lot to ask of a man, but he seems to be down for all this.

There’s slightly less Jaime in the opening episodes of this season, so I’m not really as invested as I normally would be. I generally do not like romances, and I haven’t read any of the books this show is based on, but I actually like the show for the romance between Claire and Jaime. Go figure! I guess I’m just a sucker for a period romance, I guess.

 

Forthcoming

This weekend is the debut of the show Mindhunter by David Fincher on Netflix. I’ll definitely be watching it, as its based on one of John Douglas’ non-fiction books on serial killer profiling. I’ve read all of his books as he makes the topic very accessible. Also I like David Fincher. The Atlantic review is here:

https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/10/mindhunter-review-netflix/542781/

 

My review for the first few episodes will be next week along with my long form review of Bladerunner 2049.

I was supposed to see The Mountain Between Us with Mum, but she changed her mind, the night before, and kicked me out of the house to go see what I wanted, all by myself. I really enjoyed Bladerunner, and have a lot of feelings, and thinky-thoughts about it. My review is in two parts, covering the plot and characters, in comparison to the first film and the book, and then, in part two, some of the technical stuff, like the cinematography, music, and themes.

 

Amended to add: The Supernatural Fox Sisters have a thread up on Twitter listing 31 Horror movies that feature Black women, and rather than review The Thing vs The Thing, I think I’m going to review a few of these movies instead, as some of them are my favorites exactly because there are Black women in them as the main characters.

http://www.graveyardshiftsisters.com/2017/09/watch-31-horror-movies-starring-black.html

I chose five of these movies from the list to review. I’ll surprise you with which ones.

The Fall TV Season (2017)

Here’s a list of shows I’m interested in watching for August, and the new Fall Season. I also included shows I’m not particularly interested in, but some of you might enjoy viewing. i didn’t list some of the returning shows I will be watching though. (The numbers preceding the titles, are the dates of the shows, not a rating of some kind.)

August

4 – Comrade Detective  (Amazon)

I know nothing about this show, except it appears to be set in the mid-80s, and involves a Russian detective who comes to America to solve crimes. From what I saw of the trailer it looked like a parody of 80s cop shows. Its available on Amazon Prime.

 

9 – Mr. Mercedes   (Audience Network/DirecTV)

I read the books for this series, and it’s Stephen King, so I’ll watch this. It should be a good substitute for The Mist, which turned out to be disappointingly boring. The show airs this Wednesday. Just to warn you though, the show does contain some graphic, and possibly triggering imagery:

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/gossip/confidential/mr-mercedes-creators-expect-blow-back-opening-scene-article-1.3384814

 

18 – The Defenders  (Netflix)

I still have mixed feelings about this, but I will watch it. I hate Jessica Jones, and Danny Rand, but I love Luke Cage, Daredevil and Sigourney Weaver, so I actually hope the show looks, and does well, despite my misgivings.

 

25 – The Tick (Amazon)

I was never a big fan of this character but I have seen some episodes here and there over the years, and I know some people are huge fans of both the comics and the short lived cartoon, so I’m putting this on the list. I may or may not watch it. I will add that the lead actor is absolutely perfect for the role, though.

 

September

5 – American Horror Story: Cult (FX)

I’m gearing up for the final season of this show. Its got a brand new cast, along with three, or four, old cast members. I think this season is supposed to touch on some of the themes of the previous seasons. Here! Have a creepy trailer! Hope you’re not scared of clowns.

 

10 – The Orville (Fox)

I’m not sure I want to watch this because of the lead actor, (we do not share the same type of humor, really), but the special effects look like fun, and I’m always up for a Star Trek parody, which is what this appears to be. Trailers are sometimes misleading though.

 

10 – Outlander (Starz)

I kinda like this show, and not just because Jaime is a hottie. I’ve never read any of the books, beyond the Lord Grey series, because I thought they were Romances, and that’s just not my bag. But I like the show. I’m a sucker for a good costume drama, I guess.

 

10 – Fear The Walking Dead (AMC)

I don’t watch this show because one show about The Walking Dead is harrowing enough,  but I know some people love this one, too.

 

24 – Star Trek Discovery (CBS Access)

I’m eagerly looking forward to watching this. I’ll have to subscribe to the network to watch it though. CBS All Access is a subscription cable service like Netflix. It costs 5.99 a month. The show will air the first episode on network television, after which all the episodes will be available on Access, with a  hiatus after about six episodes, and the rest of the new episodes airing  in January.

 

26 – Brooklyn 99 (Fox)

The show’s last season ended on a cliffhanger with Rosa and Jake possibly going to prison on corruption charges. It sounds like a pretty heavy plot, but this show has a way of getting you to laugh at such things, without feeling guilty about it. I’m looking forward to the new season. I love these characters and don’t like to see bad things happen to them.

 

27 – SEAL Team (CBS)

I keep saying I’m going to watch these military type shows, because I find all this Spec Ops stuff fascinating, but I keep skipping them. There’s an unspoken American jingoism in a lot of them, that just doesn’t sit well with me, and I end up just not liking the shows. Also, David Boreanaz is in this one, and I don’t like him very much.

 

28 – Gotham (Fox)

Apparently, The Scarecrow makes his debut this season. I like Killer Croc and hope he’s on the show, or planning to be. I’ve been skipping this show, because it hasn’t been holding my attention, and because some of the acting was a bit dodgy. I hated most of the female characters because their acting was terrible. I hated this show’s version of The Joker. Penguin, however, continued to be a favorite. but I’ll watch the season premiere, and see what’s what.

 

29 – Marvel’s Inhumans (ABC)

This show just looks bad. But bad with the potential to be good. I’m still mad at the show runner, Scott Buck, for inflicting the mess that was Iron Fist on us earlier this year. I swear to gob the next person who mentions the words affirmative action, and undeserving Black hires, in the same sentence is gonna catch some hands. Mediocre stains like Scott Buck are allowed to fuck up multiple times and still manage to have careers. This show could have gone to some deserving PoC instead of this guy. Okay let me stop here, because this rant can, and will, go  for several pages.

     

 

 The Exorcist (Fox)

I stopped watching this about halfway through the first season, but I know some of you out there are still really into it. (It does look kinda scary from the trailers.) Let me now how its going, and I’ll check out a few episodes ,on your rec.

 

October

1 – Ghosted (Fox)

I’ve loved Craig Robinson, ever since Hot Tub Time Machine, a movie I profoundly hated. I also remember him from Reno 911, as the commercial conman who was always singing using the same five notes on his synthesizer. He also did some hilarious cameos on Brooklyn 99. I was wondering when he’d get his own show and I’m set to watch this one, where he plays some regular yahoo, who gets involved in some afterlife type of shenanigans, although it mostly just looks like a buddy-cop show, with ghosts.

 

2 – Lucifer (Fox)

I’m not a fan of this but I heard the show has greatly improved since season one. I’m still not inclined to watch any of it, because I object to the woobification of evil characters. That whole “I’m not really bad. I just like a little drinkin’ and whorin’,” shtick gets real old with me, real fast. If a character is gonna be evil don’t make excuses for them. Just let them be evil.

 

   The Gifted (Fox)

This show isn’t filling me with a great deal of confidence that it will be interesting. Right now it looks like Riverdale with superpowers, and I hate Riverdale so…nah! Also I’m kinda getting tired of the whole’ government is after superpowered people” plot. I find it difficult to believe that anything formed by the US government would have their shit together enough to be that organized. Private companies could pull it off, but not the government.

 

10 – The Flash (CW)

I watched the last season, and still have no idea what the hell is happening on this show. I’ll probably watch this just to figure out what’s going on.

     

 

Legends of Tomorrow (CW)

I’m really looking forward to this. The show is adding some  new characters, and Damien Darhk is rumored to be back on the show this season. Also I’m a huge Firestorm fan and never get tired of looking at Jax. Vixen is also a favorite who clearly needs her own damn show.

Black Lightning doesn’t air until 2018, but I’m going to check it out, as CW becomes the Official DCEU network.

12 – Supernatural (CW)

Yep! Gonna watch!

       Arrow (CW)

Nope. I always fall asleep on this show. I don’t know why!

 

22 – The Walking Dead (AMC)

Yep! Gonna watch!

 

27 – Stranger Things (Netflix)

I think I’ll watch the second season of this, which looks more interesting than the first.  I watched a few episodes, and wasn’t greatly impressed, but it also wasn’t bad either, in that I didn’t fall asleep. It does have kids in it, and I’m allergic to watching those sometimes. At any rate, it looks like a good tide-over until the release of Stephen King’s IT, in theaters next year.

 

November

2 – SWAT (CBS)

Another military themed show I’m planning to look at, and then don’t.

 

14 – Future Man (Syfy)

I got nothing. I know nothing beyond the fact that Seth Rogen is involved, and I sorta, kinda like him and this title. I know Josh Hutcherson is in it too, and I have no idea who the hell he is, nor do I care to Google him. I will, however, give the show a looky-loo,  see what’s up, and let you know what I think. The Trailer doesn’t tell you much either.

 

21 – The Runaways (Hulu)

This looks like a better match for me than The Gifted. The trailer for he Gifted just looks really bad, I think. But I like the idea behind this show, and I’ve read a few of the comic books its based on, about the sons and daughters of some kind of Superteam, (like the JLA) battling with their superparents. The showrunners say they’re not going to do the usual racist stereotype stuff, so I’m holding them to that promise. this is another one with no trailer.

 

29 – Vikings (History)

Hell if I know. I watched all the other seasons without understanding why I love this show. I might as well finish it up.

 

Midnight Texas, Charlaine Harris’ new show has already begun and is approaching its third/fourth episode. Teen Wolf is finishing its last season, and I’ve pretty much skipped it, for reasons, although I will watch the finale. The show has moved to Sunday nights at 8PM without telling anybody, though.

The most recent show to air is The Sinner, starring Jessica Biel, which I wasn’t particularly interested in, although some of you might be interested, because there may be some supernatural element involved in its plot.

Preacher is nearing its end, and I’m a little behind in my episodes because I’ve been watching movie re-runs (like The Thing and Robocop), and I need to stop it. Game of Thrones is also in its final season, but I’m not much of a fan and I’ve been skipping the episodes. I will watch the Finale though.

I will try to watch Ash Vs. The Evil Dead Season 3, even though I missed the last season. The Punisher is set to be released in November on Netflix. I really liked this character in Daredevil, and I’m looking forward to the show.

 

Coming in 2018:

We’ll be seeing the second seasons of Legion, Luke Cage and Jessica Jones, this year. Cloak and Dagger, and The New Warriors is set to be released. I’m looking forward to the New Warriors because Squirrel Girl will be prominently featured.

This isn’t a complete list. For that, visit:

https://www.newsarama.com/30432-the-full-comic-book-television-release-schedule.html

 

And we promise to keep an eye on this show, since the showrunners already feel a need to get out ahead and defend it.

‘Kevin (Probably) Saves The World’ Creators Promise To Sidestep Clichéd People Of Color Trope – TCA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forthcoming Shenanigans

I have not been posting much lately,  mostly because …Holidays!!! and being really, really tired. I think critiquing  Westworld really took a lot out of me. But when  January 1st rolls around, you can expect me to get back on the horse, resume my regime, play ball,  and whatever other metaphors I can mix in there.

This new year, I want to focus exclusively on television,  from a Race and  Feminist viewpoint. I love a lot of different types of TV, so I wouldn’t feel right only limiting myself to shows that had PoC prominently listed in the cast. Some shows just aren’t going to have that, considering the nature of the television industry, and that I’m old enough to be used to that sort of thing. I’m capable of watching shows without PoC in them, with only a little bit of grumbling.

I’ll talk about movies, mostly in the form of Meta-Critiques of the plots, themes and characters, the way I did with the Captain America and It Follows. I enjoyed writing those and people seemed to like reading them. I will keep doing Meta-Critiques of television shows too. People seemed to really like the Dolores/Maeve Meta I wrote on Westworld. Its one of my most popular metas,  and I want to keep doing those types of posts.

A lot of the reason I write such things is that I enjoy reading them myself,  but can’t find anything like it online. There are some things I’ve  just taken it upon myself to do, and connecting popular television shows to Racial and Feminist Rhetoric, seems to be one of those things. Most of the critiques I’ve read, are primarily about the White characters, or from a White Feminist perspective. My thinking was that  most of  these writers don’t know enough about racialized sexism to be able to discuss the topic, and those people who are writing about it, aren’t focusing their lens at Pop culture.

Some of the critiques I’ve been turning over in my mind:

A character analysis of Sam Wilson from The Winter Soldier

An analysis of static vs dynamic characters in the movies of Quentin Tarantino

How to write a novel about the Apocalypse

Victor Salva

The Toxic Male Duo

The Treatment of Mental Disability in Hannibal

I remember telling you guys I’d planned on reviewing the midwinter finales of The Walking Dead and Westworld. I may still do the Westworld one (Apparently I haven’t learned my lesson about that show, I guess) but the Walking Dead review is probably off the table. I’m going to wait until something really worth talking about happens, as I’m unhappy with this season.

And yeah, I’m still doing the rewatch of Hannibal. I’m almost done with season two. I’m going to  finish it all up with season three, which in my mind, is the most important season. Bryan Fuller is still talking about a continuation of the series and which direction it might go. I’m lobbying for a six part series on Netflix.

I also planned a bunch of movie reviews,and I may still do them but right now, they’re not really on my radar.What I’ve listed above are just the posts I’m most excited about finishing right now, so don’t worry, the element of surprise isn’t completely gone.

Next up: My favorite books, movies and TV shows of 2016.

On Tumblr This Week

 

*On Tumblr this week, we have an example of my rather juvenile sense of humor. I laughed at this til I cried (No, seriously, there were tears running down my face! I had to stop reading!), and its not even because I don’t like Benedict Cumberbatch, although yeah, he’s not  conventionally pretty, and a lot of English actors have too much personality in the facial area. I actually like the guy but I’m not averse to making fun of his name.

But it was that last line  that broke something, though.

mettatontrash:

mettatontrash:

“some people dont think [unattractive british actor] is hot???

well

[image of unattractive british actor]

does

[image of unattractive british actor]

this

[image of unattractive british actor]

change

[image of unattractive british actor]

your

[image of unattractive british actor]

mind?”

[3 more images of unattractive british actor]

no it actually doesnt he still looks like a shoe

im glad we’re all on the same page

Source: mercytrash he looks like a bleached lizard
Yeah, from now on, this is what I’m going to think every time I hear someone ask this question.
@
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reverseracism poonany
When people ask your ethnicity/race it’s because they want to know which stereotypes to apply to you
Source: sailormixt
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For some reason, this hadn’t occurred to me (and if it didn’t occur to me I know it didn’t occur to a lot of other Black people), the reason we’re seeing so many White people acting a fool in the Klandom, is because there are more and more PoC actually participating (I mean really participating, not just cheering from the sidelines) in mainstream media, and its gotten harder and harder to ignore our presence in Geek Culture, as writers and cos-players and such.
If they’re used to only ever seeing White people, as the lead characters, in the media they consume, then all these Blacks and gays and  women, in TV shows and movies,  all over “their” media is probably going to be alarming, especially if they’ve only ever paid lip service to the ideas of equality, or never paid any attention to the inequality.
I’m willing to bet the vast majority of White men doing the most complaining now, are guys who loved the idea of equality and fair treatment as long as they didn’t have to see it, practice it themselves, or hear about it. As long as if didn’t affect them getting boners from their favorite female characters, or pretending they were the latest onscreen hero, it was not ever a problem.These are people who have NEVER confronted even the concept that they might be racist. After all, how could they be racist? They played vidoegames with that black guy, that one time! And now everything is changing! Things are all higgledy-piggledy! There’s women and black people all over the place(not really) and people keep changing the races and colors and dogs and cats are living together and  OMG… IT’S THE END OF HUMAN CIVILIZATION!!!!
(That is, of course, if the given way to handle the apocalypse, is by screaming death threats at strangers, on Twitter, and ignoring the irony, that by doing so, they are contributing directly to the collapse of human civilization!)

rant alert

onlyblackgirl:

diversehighfantasy:

stitchmediamix:

allerasphinx:

jillian-fucking-holtzmann:

I really don’t understand why everyone is so angry about Zendaya playing Mary Jane in the next Spider-Man movie. Yeah, in the comics she was a redhead. So what?

Everyone was fine with having a black man as a stormtrooper and a black man as the human torch but as soon as a black woman gets an important role in a movie it’s “ruining their childhood” apparently.

The same happened with Leslie Jones in the new Ghostbusters movie. Nobody had an issue with a black man in the original but, as soon as a black woman has an important role in the franchise, she’s bombarded with hate and compared to a gorilla.

It’s completely ridiculous how much hate female poc in the media are getting at the moment.
Personally, I 100% support Zendaya as Mary Jane and I think the movie will probably be awesome (fingers crossed).

People really need to stop complaining about things like this “ruining their childhood” because it’s really just pathetic.

Yeah no, there was a movement to boycott TFA because JJ cast John Boyega.

People also had issues with MBJ as Human Torch.

The same thing happens every single time a person of colour wins a role previously played by a white person.

It’s been about eight years and there are still people mad about Samuel Jackson as Nick Fury.

People at one point were threatening to boycott Thor when Idris Elba was first cast as Heimdall.

When Candice Patton was cast as Iris West people came put with the same things they’re saying about Kiersey Clemons as movie!Iris and Zendaya as MJ.

Please don’t frame it as a new thing. This is how comic fans (and nerddom) as a whole behaves and been behaving for over a decade. They want to keep us in what they perceive to be “our place” and they do so by framing themselves as comic snobs put to protect their canon.

This is how these fans have always felt and what they’ve always done when racebending came into play.

Yeah, it seems “new” because there have been so few black leads in genre films. Will Smith got it too with iRobot and I Am Legend (though a lot of white nerds now use those roles as examples of times when it was OK).

If you look at James Gunn’s Facebook after he gave MCU fans a talking to over their racism regarding the rumor that Zendaya is the new Mary Jane, a LOT of commenters take exception to Jordan’s Johnny Storm even if they’re OK with Zendaya’s MJ. It’s not purely sexism by a long shot. Just look at the TFA fandom, MCU, Blade, etc.

No one has ever been fine with black leads lmao.

From James Gunn: 

To put it lightly, all hell broke loose the other day when Zendaya was announced as the new Mary Jane for Spider-Man: Homecoming. James Gunn (Director of Guardians of the Galaxy) got on his Facebook and offered up his comprehensive take on the matter:

People get upset when something they consider intrinsic to a comic book character changes when adapted for a film. I get this. There are movies I dislike because I think there’s a basic misunderstanding of the story or the character when the comic is transferred to film (I still hate how in the first Batman movie the Joker was revealed as the murderer of Bruce Wayne’s parents, for instance.)That said, I do not believe a character is the color of his or her skin. When Michael B Jordan was cast as Johnny Storm I didn’t understand the uproar. The primary characteristic of Johnny was not, to me, that he was white, or that he had blonde hair, but that he was a fiery, funny, big-mouthed braggart of a hero. I was happy that he was going to be played by one of the finest and most charming young actors out there.Yesterday, a rumor broke out that the character of Mary Jane was being played by a young black woman, Zendaya, and all hell broke out on the Internet (again). I tweeted that if people find themselves complaining about Mary Jane’s ethnicity they have lives that are too good. (For those of you who think this means I’m confirming that Zendaya IS playing MJ, realize that although I’ve read the Spidey script, and I’ve met the actress in question, I have no idea what her role is. There’s a good chance someone told me at one time or another, but, if so, I can’t remember. I’m going to find out when I go into Marvel this afternoon, but I feel free to speak until that time because it’s about the concept about a black woman playing Mary Jane, not the actuality or hypothesis of it.)I got a thousand or so responses to my tweet. Most of them were positive. Some folks disagreed – they thought the character should look like what she looks like in the comics – but were thoughtful. And a handful were flat out racist.I can’t respond to the racists – I’m not ever going to change their minds. But for the thoughtful majority of you out there:For me, if a character’s primary attribute – the thing that makes them iconic – is the color of their skin, or their hair color, frankly, that character is shallow and sucks. For me, what makes MJ MJ is her alpha female playfulness, and if the actress captures that, then she’ll work. And, for the record, I think Zendaya even matches what I think of as MJ’s primary physical characteristics – she’s a tall, thin model – much more so than actresses have in the past.Whatever the case, if we’re going to continue to make movies based on the almost all white heroes and supporting characters from the comics of the last century, we’re going to have to get used to them being more reflective of our diverse present world. Perhaps we can be open to the idea that, although someone may not initially match how we personally conceive a character, we can be – and often are – happily surprised.

 

@
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finnnorgana errrbodylovesfinn

so-smoke-em-if-you-got-em:

I’ve realized that the more diverse a cast is, the easier it is to spot the racist fans. They won’t ship a white main character with the black girl who’s his love interest because it’s “heteronormative” (it isn’t) and they want more “gay representation”. But then when his best friend is also a person of color they don’t ship them together because they just “don’t see them that way”. But then they’ll headcanon a Tragic Whiteboy Backstory for the kid that said literally 8 words to the main character. That kid will be their favorite character, their sweet little “cinnamon roll”and there’ll be 40,230 m/m fics of him and the main character. “Representation”. My ass.

Source: so-smoke-em-if-you-got-em looks star wars fandom dead in the face
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*I’m here for a Black Riddler, though. There was a Black Catwoman once and I’m not sure how White people reacted back then (the 60s) but when I first saw Eartha Kitt, I didn’t bat an eye. Surely, we can have another one.
Incidentally, this was the reason I enjoyed Leverage so much. The one Black guy they had on the show was an IT Specialist, and one of the smartest members of the group.
halbarry batmanrogues

Anonymous asked:

Why do you think Riddler should be black ? Like isn’t he a white ginger in the comics

batmanrogues answered:

the main reason is to be a slap in the face to the angry/unintelligent black man stereotype. constantly in movies, the roles of black men are assigned to being the tough guy or the muscle. there isn’t anything wrong with that in and of itself as when it’s handled by black creators (see: luke cage) it can work tremendously well because black people are allowed to tell their own stories about themselves. however, this is often not the case in hollywood and it becomes a game of choosing black men for these same roles over and over. the riddler is someone who is intelligent, knows he is intelligent and flaunts it (sometimes to the point of overestimating himself.) how many black men in hollywood have had roles like that? off the top of my head i can’t think of a single one, and while i’m sure roles and characters like that are out there somewhere, i’m sure many people will be strapped to find examples. it would be a great role for a black man, a total flip from the hired goon to the mastermind. there are plenty of scrawny/nerdy black guys out there (and yes ginger and red-haired black people exist too) many of whom are undiscovered because big roles like these keep being handed to the same five white people. plus, i think edward’s origin story would resonate a lot more with black and poc audiences (particularly poor black audiences) than white audiences nowadays.

i support this edward nigma dc
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Since The Get Down doesn’t take place in the MCU, I don’t think we can hope that White fans will ignore Luke Cage and Black Panther in the same way they’re ignoring this show.  There have been plenty of, now critically lauded, comedies  that centered around Black people, but I have no idea how White people reacted to those things. There was no Twitter when comedies like Sanford and Son, Good Times, In Living Color, and The Fresh Prince were in their heyday. I do remember some of the controversy surrounding The Cosby Show because White  people  didn’t believe there were middle class Black people, and this was the subject of several articles in magazines at that time.
There were a few dramatic shows that didn’t revolve around White characters. I’m trying hard to think what the reaction was from White people back then, but like I said, this was mostly pre-internet, so its possible that either most White people didn’t know about these shows, knew about them but just ignored these shows, or simply had no outlet through which to express their outrage at Black people talking to each. There have always been media aimed at Black audiences, like all of Diana Ross movies. (She was like the Black version of Barbra Streisand.)
And how much of this has to do with the Internet and the ability of racists to be as angry and bigoted as they want to be, in any online space, with little or no consequences? There’s a certain class of bigot,  who act like grade school  bullies. Like those bullies, once they’ve found something they think might hurt your feelings, they keep doing that same thing, over, and over, and over again, because you’ve shown you don’t like it. Like that whole nooses in public places trend that was happening for a while in the early 2000s. It  was a really popular thing for bigots to do for a while, because they’d heard Black people complaining that they didn’t like it, and bigots are essentially lazy, and  unimaginative people, who love to find shortcuts to cause other people misery.
I predict that the harassment of Black women online is going to increase to an even worse degree, not because Black people are doing anything different but because bigots have seen that it works on some of us.
I’m just saying: Pre- internet, I have no idea how White people felt about any of these movies and shows, though.Were they mad? Outraged at no White people in these narratives? Idk! 
finnnorgana irisvwest

himteckerjam:

afatblackfairy:

kchante:

It’s funny how on my post about The Get Down and Stranger Things, people are acting like the two shows have to be of the exact same genre, to be compared.

Y’all know damn well that if The Get Down was lead by a white boy who was learning what hip-hop was, and coming into his sexuality, it would be all over the place. Y’all binge every white show there is, no matter the genre, but all of a sudden now you need an 10k word essay on why The Get Down should be watched. On why I put it in the same hype category as a show about white kids finding aliens, when let’s be honest, that happens about twice a year in every summer blockbuster.

Stop deflecting, and just own up to the fact that people aren’t checking for The Get Down, simply because it’s lead by Black and Latinx kids. Because it’s not the music that’s the issue. Y’all listen to that. It’s not the location, because y’all live there. And it’s not the Afros, because y’all love those on Halloween. The issue is the fear of enjoying something that is extremely Black/Brown, and doesn’t cater to white people. The kids aren’t ghetto, criminals, or teen mothers. They have goals, feelings, and confidence, and apparently that’s more complicated to imagine and consume, than a white girl with super powers.

YOOOOOO

This mess is exactly why Larry Wilmore just got canceled. If there’s more than two Black people it becomes a Black Thing ™ and white people can’t handle it.

Same ballpark as why fandoms set themselves on fire when the Black girl is the love interest.

This is a relatively newish form of geek/pop racism too. This wasn’t so much of a thing in the 90s/early Oughties and thats how movies and shows with Black people in them were so successful.

@
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*A nice takedown of that silly-assed Dora Milaje criticism, that she was a big ol’ meanypants to Natasha in Civil War. I thought the DM was being kinda respectful. She could’ve just tackled Natasha right there, and no one would’ve said anything. I  really like Natasha and all, but like Black Panther, I’m not above watching her get her ass kicked by the DM.  Canon has it that there have been other Black Widows, that when sent to spy in Wakanda,(where the Dora originate), never came back out again.

finnnorgana sunwukxng

paullwalkers:

what are these people talking about bashing the dora milaje for being “rude” to nat? since when are secret service polite? i’m sorry but if someone was standing there blocking president obama’s way with no intention of moving his secret service would tackle on sight idk what fantasy (or should i just come out and say racist) world yall are living in in which you believe that secret service whose career rests on protecting some of the most important people in their respective worlds would be polite to someone who is a potential threat to the president/king of their country

Source: paullwalkers

 

Tumblr Talk II

… the study of the European Middle Ages has denied blacks the right to a shared medieval past that would, in turn, authorize them to share the present that emerges from it. In other words, denying blacks medieval coevalness allows Euro-centric cultures to relegate modern blacks to a strictly modern status in which their history appears to be without the authorizing length and depth available to whites. The denial of medieval coevalness encourages students to ask, ‘Where were the black people in the Middle Ages?’ in a tone that suggests they are not entirely certain whether black people existed at all.
Cord J. Whitaker, “Race-ing the dragon: the Middle Ages, race and trippin’ into the future”
(via medievalpoc)
General Curses for the Everyday Assholes Around You

– May all the chocolate chips in your cookies turn out to be raisins

– May your headphone cord catch on every door handle

– May your phone always die when you need it most

– May you always miss a belt loop

– May every great fitting pair of pants you have stretch out disroportionately throughout the day and no longer fit

– May you always feel your phone vibrating when it’s not

–  May every sock you wear be rotated just enough to be uncomfortable

– May all your social notifications be game invites

– May you ALWAYS step in a wet spot after putting on fresh, clean socks

– May your tea be too hot when you receive/make it and then ice cold when you go back to it

– May you always pick the slowest line up

– May your shoelaces be JUST long enough not to tie without stepping on them al day

– May you stub your toe on every doorframe you go through

– May you get papercuts on every book you open

– May you step on a leggo while trying to find your way in the dark

– May your tea and coffee always be bitter

– May a bird poop on that pretty car that you feel needs to block the crosswalk/my path.

– May your keys never be where you left them.

– May you always gain back those last 5 pounds (plus one).

– May your wifi connection be one bar or less for no reason.

– May the pockets you carry your change in all suddenly develop quarter-sized holes. (but may that change always make it’s way to someone who needs it).

Oooh… these are all good…. 😉

Set a time limit on them and you’re good to go!

Source:

marvel in color; (x)

Doona Bae as The Wasp

BD Wong as Doctor Strange

Osric Chau as Iron Fist

↳ Michelle Rodriguez as Maria Hill 

↳ Alina Serban as Scarlet Witch

↳ Dichen Lachman as The Ancient One

ok i don’t usually reply to things and i don’t really have the time right now but

firstly this is a fancast. secondly, the idea of marvel casting non-white actors for traditionally white parts is neither a disservice to the characters or necessarily pandering, while their casting of white actors as either non-white or ethnically ambiguous characters, such as the Ancient One, the Wasp, and Scarlet Witch, most definitely is racist. in the Ultimates verse, the Wasp is written as biracial, with an Asian mother, and considering that Janet Van Dyne has been axed off unnecessarily in the mcu anyway, there’s no reason why she couldn’t be played or have been played by an Asian actress. Regarding both the Iron Fist and Doctor Strange, there has been a great deal of conversation about their casting by people better informed by me, but the fact that remains that their origins rely heavily on orientalist stereotypes that could have been remedied by the casting of asian actors in these roles.

the issue isn’t just that marvel should be casting minorities in roles WRITTEN FOR MINORITIES, but that they seem to be deliberately choosing to tell white stories over those about people of colour.

also seriously, they cast benedict cumberbatch because they wanted him in the mcu, not because they thought he’d be the right person for the part.

… content always reflects the politics of the creator. the fact that we have two Avengers films where the Avengers team is 100% white up till the last fifteen seconds of Age of Ultron is a political statement. the idea that the mcu makes films about characters who are “”popular”” is incorrect because before the movies were announced, no mainstream audience had heard of iron man, ant man, or doctor strange. while it is commendable that marvel/disney has launched a franchise from marvel’s less popular characters, the reason they haven’t made a black panther or captain marvel film, in addition to postponing them further in order to release antman 2 and spiderman is because their political agenda dictates that they care more about their white male characters than those played by women or people of colour. in addition, the reason samuel l jackson was cast as nick fury is because nick fury was redesigned as his likeness without slj’s permission, and his agent threatened to sue. the fact that you’re justifying a billion dollar company having not made a film starring a minority as not wanting to “”pander”” to minorities is a gross mindset, but honestly it doesn’t even matter because marvel clearly doesn’t care about making minorities happy in the first place.

 

Why is it that casting an overwhelmingly boring white cast is “Well, they’re just trying to make money.” or “They’re finding the right person.” or “That’s how it is in the comics.” But casting ANY actors of color is seen as “pandering” or “making something a political issue”? Please explain to me what about wanting to see Asian actors (or any other POC) portray characters that are based in Asian mythos and culture is political? Like, white people, why do y’all say that shit? Why can’t you just say “I’m racist and there at no niggers or spics or chinks or rag heads allowed in my all white safe spaces?” @diversehighfantasy@nerdsagainstfandomracism @jawnbaeyega

 

OK. I’m still hung up on the first response talking about this and that character is “American” when they clearly mean white.

Maria Hill is racially ambiguous but that also means American is just as valid as Asian/Asian-American/etc.

Why the hell is American being used this way in 2016? And it’s even more infuriating because plenty of American characters – like quintessentially American characters – are played by people of other nationalities (British, Australian, Irish, etc), but they’re usually white. I’ve literally never seen anyone like “uh you can’t fancast that British actor because the character is American in canon.”

i.e. Don’t pretend this is about nationality when it’s about race, especially when the nationality in question includes every damn race.

Anyway. Yeah. The MCU is indefensible in its representation of Asians and its East Asian whitewashing. The MCU is pretty indefensibly racist in general, though I keep waiting for them to make me change my mind.

It’s funny that people even try to invoke the comics in defense of the MCU’s obsession with whiteness when Marvel comics are light years ahead of the MCU. Like, why is the MCU even considering Carol Danvers when we have Kamala Khan? Why is Peter Parker the MCU’s Spider-Man when Miles Morales is joining the Avengers in the new Marvel Universe? At least the comics are trying.

Source:

I am done choosing between my womanhood and my blackness.

Stop giving me fictional white female characters and telling me “these are the fictional women to admire, the ones that break the mold, the feminist icons, the representation you’ve been longing for.”

Stop asking me to squint to see myself represented on screen. Stop telling me to “wait my turn”, to support shows with white female leads as though this was a rare occurrence, as though there haven’t been thousands of them through the years. As though white women haven’t been held as the pinnacle of progress and feminism on TV since Lucille Ball.

Stop telling me that a white woman playing a spy, is innovative and feminist when you’ve had Wonder Woman, Charlie’s Angels, Scarecrow & Mrs. King and Alias before Agent Carter.

Stop telling me that seeing Jessica Jones, a white female character with PTSD, on screen is a long time coming, a revolutionary feminist act, when Joss Carter, Abbie Mills, Olivia Pope, Sasha Williams and Michonne aren’t afforded the same treatment regarding theirs from writers, media and fandom alike.

Stop telling me that “romance is not part of the show” when said show is built on the loss of the White Male Lead’s love interest. Stop labeling black female characters as one half of a “brotp”, as the supportive friend, a mammy that does everything but wipe the white man’s ass or tuck him into bed, only to prop up the Random White Woman In The Background as the obvious choice for a new, better suited love interest.

Stop giving me Trojan Horses, those black female characters I’ve longed for, the ones I finally can see myself in, the ones that you’re praised for creating and writing, the ones you make money off of only to kill them later, once they’ve served their purpose.

We are not your first step towards success, we aren’t a tool to be used to avoid criticism, or appease higher ups afraid of losing money because of the lack of diversity and representation in their shows.

We are not either women or black, we are both and we deserve to be spies, the fated love interest, the damsel in distress, the selfish one, the vulnerable one, the pinnacle of feminism and progress, the one who’s turn has come, the one who was a long time coming.

Stop giving me a drop of water and calling it the sea.

The exploitation of African-Americans through the use of media is obvious from the films above.

1. Little Rascals (1920’s) – The coon character is one of the most insulting of all anti-black characters. The name itself is an abbreviation of raccoon and  dehumanizing. As with Sambo, the coon was portrayed as a lazy, easily frightened, chronically idle, inarticulate, buffoon.

2. King Kong (1930’s) – The brute character portrays black men as innately savage, animalistic, destructive, and criminal – deserving punishment, maybe death. This brute is a fiend, a sociopath, an anti-social menace. Black brutes are depicted as hideous, terrifying predators who target helpless victims, especially white women.  It’s been suggested that King Kong was a veiled allegory of the life of boxer Jack Johnson, who married two white women during his lifetime and was even arrested for taking one across state lines.

3. Shaft (1970’s) – Blaxploitation films are mainly set in poor neighborhoods. Ethnic stereotypes against white characters, such as “crackers” and “honky”, and other derogatory names are common plot and or character elements.

4. Lethal Weapon (1980’s) – African American males are typically cast in specific roles in American film. The usual suspects include the black sidekick of a white protagonist, the token black person, the comedic relief, the athlete, the ladies’ man, and most damaging, the violent black man.

5. Menace to Society (1990’s) – In the 1990s the typical cinema and television, the brute was nameless — sometimes faceless; he sprang from a hiding place, he robbed, raped, and murdered. He represented the cold brutality of urban life. Often he was a gangbanger.

6. Norbit (2000’s) – This was the mammy caricature, and, like all caricatures, it contained a little truth surrounded by a larger lie. The caricature portrayed an obese, coarse, maternal figure. She had great love for her white “family,” but often treated her own family with disdain.

Be careful while watching television (tell-our-vision) because it is a Lethal Weapon that can turn Little Rascals into a Menace to society!!!!

  1. anonymous asked:

    those who defend the mcu problematic shit saying “is a DIFFERENT version, not the comics!!!!!1!!” yeah dude, but why it must be a version were mostly characters are white, cis males??

    mcufandomhatespeopleofcolor answered:

    Just in case people don’t believe you about it being a version that’s predominantly white cis men here’s a handy visual guide to the white parade up to 2013

    So you gotta think in the films the only supporting PoC in the films you can add to this are 2 supporting characters Sam Wilson and Helen Cho. (Before anyone asks none of the PoC actors in Guardians of the Galaxy count as representation because they had on body paint/CGI and were presented as aliens).  Meanwhile you can add literally a twice as many white men and women here’s an incomplete list:

    • Sharon Carter,
    • Wanda Maximoff (whitewashed)
    • Pietro Maximoff (whitewashed)
    • Peter Quill

    And that’s literally only the good guys.  At this rate white people in the MCU films are being added at twice the rate as PoC.  Plus Ant-Man is coming out and that looks extremely white too with only white leads and no significant PoC roles at all.

    This isn’t counting the fact that although AOS is diverse its only the PoC and queer white women who keep getting killed off.  Or the fact that Agent Carter is completely white and that all the main cast on Daredevil is white.  And of the PoC on Daredevil they’ve already killed off Ben and Claire is rumored to come back but she only had five appearances.

    And if anyone cares at all the US isn’t as white as these films, its only 62% white, with white men only comprlsing like 31% of the population so the super whiteness super maleness of the MCU is really freaking obvious.

    TL;DR The MCU is a much whiter much more male centered world than the comics or the current US demographics.

     

     

    anonymous asked:

    After recent events and stuff fandom has been talking and debating about I’m wondering if anyone has ever made a list of PoC who gets killed in TV? Particularly one for this year.

    queerhawkeye answered:

    That would be a way longer list than [the 152 dead lesbians], and growing at a much faster rate, God.

    A quick google search didn’t show any specific list, though it did remind me that there is a much older and much more widespread counterpart for the Bury Your Gays trope: the Black Dude Dies First trope. The article has a handy list of some of the characters that fit the trope, and, though the list in movies is longer, there is a good handful of examples in live action TV.

    • The black and latinx characters killed off in five seasons of Breaking Bad alone are probably close to a hundred. (See: [All deaths in BrBa] and [BrBa’s race problem])
    • Literally every production about a white guy who knows martial arts kills off nameless Asian characters like they get paid by the corpse. (Daredevil, [maybe]?)
    • The whole “post-apocalyptic dystopia” genre is based off on one white dude inexplicably staying alive while all the brown people around him keep dying. ([TWD] and [FTWD]!)

    This discussion happens with… like… every show. [The 100]. [Supernatural]. [Agents of SHIELD]. [LOST]. I could probably just keep googling “[name of show] + racism” and get a more and more lists of characters of color killed to move the plot forward, for shock value, to cause a white character’s guilt, because [a racist writer didn’t get along with the actor], etc.

    The disproportionate amount of violence inflicted on characters of color on TV, I think, shouldn’t need to be proved with lists or stats –not that there aren’t lists, stats or even [academic writings] on the subject. There are characters of color in almost all shows, and they are getting killed off almost every episode in literally any show with an average level of violence. Cop shows, action shows, supernatural shows, horror shows, sci-fi shows, they all show brown dead bodies weekly.

    I don’t doubt that there are, somewhere, stats on how these numbers aren’t getting better with time, lists and percentages and essays on how all our favorite “””diverse””” shows use characters of color as canon fodder. Maybe seeing the numbers all laid out would do something against the normalization of brown deaths in TV.

    But making a list of, say, all the dead characters of color in television in the first three months of 2016 would… probably be a considerable feat, but doable. Making a database and building proper stats, like @autostraddle’s [Ultimate Stats of WLW in TV], of all the dead characters of color in the history of Anglo-speaking Western television would require an incredible amount of work, people and time. Not that it’s impossible, but the numbers are fucking abysmal.

 

This is what its like on Tumblr!

And So It Begins

I’m going to start off my Fall viewing season by trying to cover as many shows as I can. I’ve already given a rundown in a previous post about which shows I was most interested in, which shows are just “meh” and which ones I was flat-out not looking at. Nevertheless,  I’ve probably forgotten by now  which ones ones I said I would cover, anyway.

This one is a little late but we’ll start with:

Bastard Executioner:

image

I like this show. It looks good and it’s got some great actors in it. I didn’t pay much attention to the plot and I don’t know how much cultural accuracy is involved in its particular version of the Middle Ages. But here’s what I was thinking as I watched the premiere: Boy! are these people dirty. There’s dirt everywhere and on everyone, even the people you would think wouldn’t be dirty, the members of the nobility. At the very least, these people are engaging in living with some powerful odors.

The show opens with people fighting and fucking and at no point do we see people bathe, even  though they were just engaged in some sweaty and dirty activities. Bathing is discussed fairly often, so theoretically, it does exist in this world, but no one seems to want to take the time to do it, and I found this very distracting. Hell, people didn’t even wipe themselves with warm cloths, or do that thing where they splash their faces with water, out of those water bowls people always seem to have in historical dramas.

This show is by the same creators of Sons of Anarchy, so I expect lots and lots of intrigue. I paid just enough attention to the plot to recognize Bill the Vampire as a schemer of the first order, so I hope he lasts a good long while, and that Brattle needs a personality donation. I do understand that his wife and family got fridged on his behalf but, really dude! It’s okay to change facial expressions. I think I saw Katie Segal, but she wasn’t wearing any makeup, so it was really hard to tell it was her. She plays a witch on the show and I kept staring at the actress’ face, trying to see Katie in it, and getting frustrating glimpses.

I think I glimpsed some Black people in the background of one scene, which I found heartening. I like that the writers remember that Black people had been invented by the Middle Ages and had been engaged in  something besides slavery. You know, sometimes, we just hung out with people and farmed or something.

I’m going to keep watching this one, despite the distraction of “dirt”. I don’t know that I’ll ever get used to it though, and if nothing else, this show really makes me appreciate indoor plumbing.

Let’s move on to:

Gotham

image

I wasn’t greatly interested in watching the second season of this, as I was not impressed with the first. Also I had some difficulties watching it, which I will get into in a short moment.

I’m a Black woman, who lives in the U.S. Gotham was released last year, right during the height of media reporting of police brutality incidents, against African Americans. Every report left me an emotional wreck. This was true of a lot of people I know.

I, sort of, liked the show. Well, at least I didn’t hate it.  I enjoyed watching Fish Mooney tearing up the scenery and I liked how batshit some of the plots and characters were, but I had to stop watching the show, not just just because the series kept getting worse but because I could no longer watch police misconduct on television, without having severe anxiety attacks and comparing it to real life. It’s called escapist TV for a reason and this wasn’t escapist for me. I couldn’t watch the corrupt Gotham PD beat up suspects, railroad people into prison, accept graft, lying and engage in bribery and consider it entertainment.

I still can’t.

So, I was more than a little reluctant to watch this season of the show, but wanted to try again. As a general rule, I avoid cop shows anyway, mostly because they’re all alike, but I had an especially difficult time watching any of them since last year. Every time a police officer shot someone, I had severe anxiety and had to stop watching. Whenever an officer refused to shoot someone, I had severe anxiety and had to turn the channel. It was best to just stay the Hell away from such shows altogether , as I could no longer approach these shows as entertainment, and could only think of them as an indictment against real police officers, no matter how fantastical the show.

The first few minutes of this season’s premiere had me wanting to turn the channel, again. The only reason I got past Gordon being unwilling to shoot some crazy in the street, is because he had already been established as largely uncorruptable, during season one. But it did get increasingly difficult to watch as Gordon kept getting further enmeshed in the villains schemes. He ultimately chose not to, so I still have faith that he will try to remain a good guy, despite the temptations around him.

That said, I am still not impressed with this episode. I’m still not greatly interested in any of the characters. I hate Selina Kyle. I just hate that actress.  Bruce Wayne is less than lackluster as a character, although, I like Alfred. The women are all paradoxically annoying and characterless, which is an amazing feat of engineering, especially Barbara Keene. I don’t think the writers have a single damn clue what to do with her. This is a character flailing around in search of a plot. I’m still into watching the villains scheme and I may keep watching the show because it says it’s specifically about them this season,  but my question is, considering how awful the GPD is, what makes that different from last season?

Oh,  and the guy who plays the Joker, is just fucking annoying. He’s trying too damn hard to be Joker-ish and it seriously got on my nerves. Like he’s trying to channel both Cesar Romero and Heath Ledger and it’s just not working. I think it’s because he’s just not the great an actor. He simply doesn’t have enough depth to accurately portray the complexity of the Joker, who is technically, not insane, but is insane. But t’s just the premiere. Maybe he’ll develop depth later on, I hope.

I won’t be reviewing this show again unless I see something extraordinary or have something especially poignant to say.

Next we will tackle:

Minority Report

image

I  was very looking forward to watching the pilot, even though I wasn’t especially interested in the trailer. I’m one of the few people on earth willing to openly admit to being a Tom Cruise fan, so yeah, I actually enjoyed the movie a lot, and I was interested in seeing how the show would handle the movie’s basic plot line.

The show doesn’t start on a good note. The narrator chronicles the history of the pre-cogs, and the children portraying them are awful. I know the scene is supposed to be all tragic and shit but I just thought it was funny. Thankfully, it gets a little better after that.

This world is very clean and modern and run by machines and I enjoyed looking at it. It’s not utopian, although I don’t like the idea of ads that detect when you’re feeling stressed, so you can be offered drugs to calm down. None of the police dress like service professionals. They all dress like they came off some avant garde runway and they talk like teenagers, so it’s hard to take them seriously.

I do like that the creators have a Black woman in the lead. They  are probably trying to capture some of that Sleepy Hollow magic, although this show mostly reminds me of Almost a Human, a show I really enjoyed and wish this one was, instead. And although the actress isn’t bad, she’s less than compelling in this episode but she tries, though. Maybe she’ll develop more personality later. And yes, I was horribly distracted by those tiny gloves she wears. Really, people! Ya’ll couldn’t find some gloves that fit?  I was also distracted by the makeup on that one Asian woman. It’s stupid and I kept laughing at it. She doesn’t look like a professional anything. She looks like she’s going to a rave. Vega is really cute and we get to see her in a lot of really tight clothes, but I keep unfavorably comparing her to the lead from Sleepy Hollow. I know that’s not fair but I couldn’t help it.

The year is 2065, and there are PoC all over this show, so the writers have been paying attention, not just to things like the future of technology but to future social and population trends, as well, and I liked that.  I liked seeing Hispanics in the future. It’s nice to know they’re still around, unlike the TV shows of the past where PoC had all disappeared to their own planet or alternate dimension or something. The movie was really good at trying to predict technology and neglected the social and people angles of the future. I liked that the show didn’t turn the presence of PoC into Hallmark moments. They’re just regular people, working jobs and shit.

I liked that even though Vega (yes, its a dumb name) believes Dash is a precog and is willing to accept his crime predictions, she keeps refusing to believe any of his other, smaller  predictions, like where she should stand or what she’ll be having for dinner. It’s also nice to see she has a family, although that felt kind of tacked on. Her Mom is, like 65, and she has a tiny brother, who I already don’t like. I also didn’t like the cheesy music that was orchestrated to make the viewer feel excitement, but maybe that gets better later.

Dash is the pre-cog who allies himself with her as a way to prevent the murders he sees but doesn’t have the resources to stop. I have a little trouble accepting the premise of crimes you can stop before they happen, as traditionally, that’s not actually what the police do. I mean, they do sort of, but not really. Mostly they engage in the cleanup of crimes that have already been committed, and capturing the perpetrator of those, is what stops future crimes by that person, I guess.

At one point Dash has a seizure in a restaurant and says that phrase from the movie and I know it’s suppposed to be a serious moment, but I laughed at it. Does that make me a bad person? At another moment, they question an old guy who runs away, and Vega chases him, (because there has to be an obligatory chase scene,) and I couldn’t help thinking that this looks like an investigation run by amateurs, or the writers really don’t know about police investigations, and are just making shit up as they go. Anyone who has ever watched the show 48 Hours, knows that detectives don’t operate like this. This is pure TV show detectiving.

I did feel  a little better when the actor from the movie, the one who took care of the precogs, showed up with some tech that allowed Vega to see what Dash sees, while trying to prevent the murder of a businessman’s wife by some diseased birds. I automatically suspected the husband as the perpetrator, so I wasn’t really invested in that part of the plot, which is kind of silly.

Dash’s sister, Agatha, does put in an appearance and she asks Dash some very pertinent questions, which he is very vague about, and she has a few dire predictions,too. His brother shows up to and is a dick. I had those same questions Agatha did, though, and they were not answered to my satisfaction.

I’m probably going to keep watching it, despite that it’s not a compelling show, because Wilmer Valderama is in it and that man is Hawtness Incarnate. I could watch him all day, and I have…in From Dusk Til Dawn: The Series, where he plays a really hawt Mexican vampire. I don’t love this show yet because it could be improved by having Valderama bite somebody.

Lastly, we’ll discuss:

Blindspot

image

I had no intention of watching this but it was on and I was reviewing, so it wasn’t out of my way or anything. I’m not really into espionage shows and this one looked like a cross between The Bourne Identity and Memento, and I enjoyed both those movies.

Let me be frank in stating that I have no idea who the Hell Jaime Alexander is. She looks vaguely familiar, so she must have starred adjacent to a show I liked, but not actually in one of them. I really like her, though and I’m going to keep watching this.

Jane Doe is a really interesting character. There’s an intriguing mystery and Jaime really sells the despair, confusion and bewilderment, which was giving me all kinds of feels and the episode really seemed very like The Bourne Identity, only this particular episode had a clearer purpose, in which she and Agent Weller  try to stop a Chinese terrorist attack on New York City.

I didn’t buy the FBI’s excuse for letting her tag along with them on a case, though. Those guys are some fairly dense and stubborn MFs, and once they get an idea in their heads, there’s no talking them out of it, I don’t care how angry or determined you act. The real FBI cannot be swayed by temper tantrums or appeals to civility or logic. But it’s a TV show, so I do realize, if she doesn’t tag along on their cases, there will be no show. Agent Weller does seem to spend an inordinate amount of time trying to persuade  her to stay in the car, while he investigates, until she throws some logic at him, about why he’s wrong, and then  he relents.

I did enjoy the scenes where she  kicks some ass. That was kind of fun although I do have to say, watching White people beat up people of color also so makes me feel deeply uncomfortable. Apparently, I like my violence to be intraracial. I don’t know why.

I liked some of the other characters in the show. There are several women and PoC, both men and women, but, once again, we get a lack of Hispanic representation, even though it’s set in NY,  and you’ve got a bad Asian guy. Actually there are several bad Asian guys. I get that this was in Chinatown and that’s where bad Asian guys would probably be found but I still didn’t like it. It didn’t  seem like an international thing, though. Just a disgruntled guy, in a desperate situation. But the whole Yellow Peril thing, in action shows, is getting tired, which is why I’m hoping the series Rush Hour will do better, on that front.

I like that the other characters on the show have a little personality of their own, are quietly snarky to Weller, have some  skills of their own, and some of them get a little mystery attached to them, although we spend most of our time with Weller and Doe.

Weller, whose name is prominently tattooed on Jane’s back, doesn’t have a whole lot of personality himself, beyond squinting and determination, but Jane has attached herself to him as her anchor, nevertheless. She keeps hugging him, and you can see the discomfort on his face as she clings to him, as the only semi-known factor in her life.  I only hope that they remain just friends and the series doesn’t do the whole “will they or won’t they” bullshit, because that’s a very tired trope, and  I’m heartily sick of seeing it.

I really liked the show, though. I didn’t  think I would. I will tune in next week, for it.  I like to plan my viewing habits but sometimes that planning gets broadsided by a really intriguing show and the shows I thought I would love, turn out to be a bust.  I hope this one sticks around and becomes as good as Person of Interest, which I also fell into by accident.

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