The Mist (2007)

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Normally this would be a comparison between The Mist film, and the TV show, but I didn’t watch the TV show beyond the first couple of episodes. I got bored. The TV show ain’t got nothing on the movie, probably because Frank Darabont had nothing to do with it, and the two people who were involved with it had a very different vision of what The Mist was about.

The series was a hot mess, that was slow and mostly incoherent, and was finally canceled.  I was hopeful that it would be good, (I’m always hopeful that a show will be good), but I was a bit dubious when I heard there wouldn’t be any monsters in the show, and I think part of the reason for its failure, is  fans of the movie had one idea of how it should be, and the creators had a completely different, and incompatible, idea

And of course, it’s really hard to top the original movie that it was based on. Frank Darabont has proven to be something of a genius when it comes to adapting Stephen King’s stories, having directed not just The Mist, but The Shawshank Redemption (which I loved), and The Green Mile, (which I hated for  different reasons.)

Except for the controversial ending, The Mist is faithful to the novella after which it’s named, and that’s part of its success, because  the story is a very effective study of human nature under extreme conditions, and you can’t get more extreme than being trapped in an enclosed space, while being menaced by giant hungry monsters.

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The Grey Widower

I wrote an essay on how to write the apocalypse novel, and I used The Mist as the type of  framework that many writers could try to hang such a story on, but really I have to credit Agatha Christie with making the premise famous, (although its much, much older than her) of a small group of people, trapped in a  space they can’t leave, who start mysteriously dying. It’s an idea that seems to work especially well with horror movies, in everything from Alien (outer space), to Friday the 13th (the woods), to Night of the Living Dead (the home). The only thing that you can truly change about such stories is the size, and nature, of the space, (jungles, warehouses, summer camps, spaceships) the type of people dying (usually White, with a token PoC thrown in for variety), and why (probably monsters). Along the way, the survivors have to navigate the human monsters of greed, stupidity, callousness, cowardice, insanity…

In The Mist, David Drayton, his son Billy, and neighbor, Brent Norton get trapped inside a local grocery when a mysterious mist descends, a mist that contains some very hungry creatures. Also trapped with them is a small contingent of local people, along with Mrs. Carmody, a woman with the reputation of being a kind of hedge witch, who is also a  religious fanatic.The two standout performances are from Andre Braugher as Norton , and Marcia Gay Harden, as  Mrs. Carmody, with Melissa Mcbride (aka Carol from The Walking Dead) in her big film debut, making this a grand trifecta of awesome. Bringing up the rear, but never slouching, is Toby Jones, William Sadler, Sam Witwer, and Laurie Holden as Amanda Dunfrey, a woman David has an attraction to.

The Stephen King Multiverse

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The Leviathan

Near the small town of Bridgton Maine is a military facility that’s believed to be responsible for the descent of the Mist, after a huge thunderstorm knocks out  the power in the town. The book suggests it was some experimental physics event created by something called The Arrowhead Project, that triggered the Mist, and Stephen King (and many fans ) have made this story part of the Stephen King Universe by suggesting that the Project opened what’s known in other King books, as a “thinny”, a portal between the worlds.

My personal theory was that the portal opened into what King calls “todash” space, the dark void between the different worlds, which is inhabited by different types of monsters, like Tak , from The Regulators, and the creatures in this story. Todash Space is also something heavily referenced in The Dark Tower books, and at the opening of the movie, we can see David Drayton painting a picture of Roland Deschain, from The Dark Tower.

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David Drayton

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Thomas Jane, as David Drayton, just manages to just hold his own in this movie, which is impressive, as I never credited him as a particularly fine actor, although he has had a long career in film. Here, he’s supposed to be our everyman character, with whom the audience is meant to identify, and through which we’re meant to get into the story. His most direct nemesis’ is not the mist, but Edward Norton, a representative of disbelief, and later, Mrs. Carmody, who represents too much belief.

David tries to navigate these two approaches to their extreme circumstances, without falling into either the camp of delusion and denial, called The Flat Earth Society, in the book, or hysterical religious ideation, like Mrs. Carmody. In the novel, David has an affair with Amanda Dunfrey, as a form of solace over the loss of his wife, but in the film, Darabont stated that the two of them having an affair would make David’s character less sympathetic, so that was removed from the script. It would also have had the unintended side effect of the audience supposing that David was being punished for his adultery with her, especially if that was coupled with Darabont’s ending.

The ending sparked a great deal of controversy, at the time,, because it’s completely different from what happens in the book, and some viewers claim that it defeats the purpose of everything David Drayton survived beforehand. The novella itself is open-ended, David and the others never find their way out of the mist, although it ends on a hopeful note. In the movie, David and his friends elect to kill themselves, rather than be eaten by the monsters,when their car runs out of gas. This made some people angry because they felt David went through so much to survive Mrs. Carmody, only to give up at the end.

But I felt this was an entirely reasonable response, if looked at along a continuum  of the kinds of  behavior we’d seen from everyone caught in the mist. In the book, some of the characters retreat from their circumstances by getting drunk, and a number of people who David says “went over”, simply go insane. People commit suicide, and retreat into religious hysteria, and denial. But the bottom line is that most of these people (except for a handful) do not want to face their situation head on. In the movie, David does, but even he and his friends are eventually defeated by the mist, and take their own lives.

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Eventually, the only survivor is David, and he realizes the futility of what they’ve done after he steps out of his vehicle, intending to just give up and be eaten by whatever monster finds him first, only to encounter the retreat of the mist, and the American military destroying any monsters left over. That was something that infuriated a lot of people. David and the others having given up too soon. Had they waited just another hour or two, they would have all survived. But my theory was that this is all an illustration of how hopelessness works. It’s immediate and intense, and must be taken care of right away. Hopelessness is a liar that has no patience, and believes there is no time.

At any rate, staying in the store wouldn’t have saved them. They would have had to leave because of Mrs. Carmody, as the military would never have arrived before she started killing more people.

 

Edward Norton

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Andre Braugher is absolutely incredible as Edward Norton. He perfectly  captures Norton’s officious resentment, from the book, and even manages to add an uncomfortable racial component, to his discussion with David in the market. Watch that scene again, where he insinuates that people are racist, without actually saying people are racist towards him.. In the book, he becomes the leader of the Flat Earth Society, a faction of people within the store who simply refuse to believe that the mist is  dangerous, or that there are monsters.

It’s never made exactly clear what Norton does for a living, but I suspect he’s a lawyer. He approaches the entire event from an argumentative stance, as if his clinging to a rational approach to their circumstances should be enough to survive it. He and his crew represent just one approach to what has happened, and they (and the bagboy, who also didn’t believe the mist was dangerous.) are the first of the store’s customers to die. After those people are dead, we are left with the  those who believe their circumstances are real, and that the monsters exist.

In the book, David states that there are so many different ways that the mind can approach what’s happened, but really there aren’t that many. People can only respond in about three ways to extreme fear: flight (whether it’s  physical (suicide), mental (insanity) from their circumstances, or flight : confronting the situation head on, in an attempt to get around it, which is what David does, and negotiation, which is what Mrs. Carmody does. Edward Norton, and Norm the bagboy, tried disbelief and confrontation, and that promptly got them killed. In the novel, several people choose flight. They just mentally check out, (they go insane), still others use alcohol, or suicide to escape. This is somewhat less evident in the movie than in the story. We don’t see any of the characters getting drunk as a way of coping with the situation, for example, and only one of the many suicides is seen.

And then  there’s Mrs. Carmody. I think, in the movie, she’s meant to represent insanity, but I don’t believe she is insane, and I’ll explain why in a moment.

Mrs. Carmody

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In the book, Mrs. Carmody is  a caricature of religious insanity, screaming about the abominations in the mist, in a bright yellow pantsuit. She starts off the story as a joke, a figure of mockery. Over the years, King has become better at writing radically religious people, but Mrs. Carmody is one of the weakest characters in the novel, as she is very one-note, and over the top. When we first meet her in the novel, she only has one setting and that is “crazy”, and she remains that way for the rest of the story. There’s no background or depth given to her. She’s little better than the monsters in the mist.

This is where Darabont’s talent for adapting King’s films comes into play. Under his creative control, Mrs. Carmody is considerably  deepened as a character. We don’t  learn anything new about her backstory, but we do learn that she is not as sure of herself as she would like everyone to believe. In the movie, she begins as a simple curmudgeon,  complaining about the smallest things. Like Norton, she sees her response to what’s happening as entirely reasonable, calmly and quietly explaining to the imprisoned crowd what will happen to everyone, if they don’t do as she says,  which is one of the best changes from the book. As the movie progresses, you  get a much better grasp of her character, especially in a scene with Amanda.

Amanda Dunfrey comes across Carmody in the lady’s restroom, and finds her in tears, as she prays to God to give her the strength to commit to His will. Amanda offers her comfort, but Mrs. Carmody’s response lets you know that she is  aware of what contempt she is held in the town, and she rejects her. She speaks from  the perspective of someone who sees herself as an underdog, a figure of mockery and disdain. She doesn’t accept Amanda’s overture of friendship because she knows Amanda doesn’t care about her, and that none of the people in the market are worthy. She honestly believes that her mission is to bring them to the glory, and submission, to the will of God.

Her scene with Amanda gives new perspective to her actions in the market. She is not as certain of her strength as she seems, not as sure she’s doing the right thing but she forges ahead anyway, and since you get the subtle impression she has just as much contempt for the townsfolk ( they are all horrible sinners) as they do for her (as the town crazy), we have to question her motivations for calling for more and more extreme ends to deal with the  mist. Her way of dealing with the mist is to try to appease the deity, from whom she believes the mist comes, but she goes about it the wrong way, as she becomes increasingly desperate to bring these folks to heel, and submit them to God’s will.

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Carmody’s belief, that she is doing God’s will, is abetted by surviving an attack by one of the mist creatures. A large dragonfly creature, with a venomous stinger lands on her, while she prays that it won’t kill her. When it doesn’t harm her, I think she sees that as a sign of God’s approval, that she is indeed doing the right thing, (after which she starts to show a certain degree of pride, and hubris, in knowing what God wants). She also shows pride in believing that she can save these people from damnation. I don’t believe she is insane, as that’s too easy. (I think her motivations are a lot darker than insanity, and some of it may be revenge against the townspeople, she feels hate her, although that’s something that’s not immediately clear, and is just my supposition.) I don’t think her motivations are  pure.

If Norton, and David, represent forms of confrontation, then Mrs. Carmody represents negotiation, which also doesn’t work in their circumstances either. Norton tries confrontation and dies, Carmody’s approach is appeasement and negotiation, and she dies, and this is why Darabont’s ending doesn’t upset me overmuch, as its entirely in keeping with the theme of the movie.

There’s only one response that saved anyone from the mist.

Surrender.

For example, Melissa McBride’s character, a nameless store customer, is one of the few people who actually survives walking out onto the mist, and I suspect it’s because she doesn’t  negotiate with it, or try to run from it, or fight it. She surrenders to it with faith, and humility, that she will be safe to save her children. She believes the mist is dangerous, but leaves the market anyway, to save her kids, and hers is one of the few motivations which is pure, and not entirely self serving. At the end of the movie, we see her riding with the soldiers, both her children with her. It is interesting that David survives only after he does what she did, which is knowingly surrender himself to the  the mist, and simply walk out into it.

 

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Ollie Weeks

Ollie Weeks is one of the truest characters from the novel to the movie. He is written as a soft and unimpressive looking store clerk, a little overweight, with hidden skills, which is exactly how Toby Jones portrays him. Ollie is a calm, stable, but melancholy presence, with the skills of a marksman, and David Drayton makes a point of stating how useful he is several times in the narrative. At no point does Ollie give in to hysteria or fear, remaining levelheaded and brave thoughout the entire movie. He seems resigned to the awfulness of the situation in the book, neither fighting ,nor retreating from reality. In the movie he turns out to be an enormous asset for the survival of the group, until he is killed in the parking lot during the groups escape from the store.

It’s interesting to note that Ollie Weeks dies just after he kills Mrs Carmody. He is not a prideful character, and seemed to genuinely regret killing her, and even though he had a very good reason for doing so, it is still murder.

 

Amanda Dunfries

Amanda isn’t that different from the novel version of her character. The movie version is a bit more naive and trusting but its an acceptable difference. In the story the characters spend a not inconsiderable amount of time arguing about the Carmody situation, and whether or not she will resort to human sacrifice. Amanda is one of the few people, along with Ollie Weeks, who elects that she will, but in the movie, Amanda argues against it, insisting that human beings aren’t that crazy.

I remember watching this [particular scene and feeling frustrated because Amanda is speaking from a deep well of white, middle class,  feminine  privilege, believing in the best outcome of the situation. Amanda is a conventionally attractive woman, who has probably known mostly kindness throughout her life, and that  is probably what forms the basis for her opinion. In neither the book or them ovie does she have a great role to play. She mostly follows David and Ollie’s decisions.

The Monsters

But the standout is the movie’s special effects and its realizations of the monsters from the books. The movie actually improves on the ones from the book making them a lot scarier, and the half seen quality of the mist makes then especially frightening.. The scene where Norm the bagboy is eaten by tentacles is an exact duplicate from the book. And the tentacles are filmed exactly as they’re described.

The creatures that were greatly improved upon from the book are the spiders. In the movie they are called Grey Widowers. (The book gives no name for them.) There is the giant lobster clawed creature that has taken up residence in the store’,s parking lot, and kills several people, including Ollie Weeks and one of the soldiers. But the most impressive creature is the realization of The Behemoth, a multistory creature that David and the others encounter after leaving the store, and is one of the highlights of the book.

As good as the book is, Frank Darabont has crafted a gorgeous retelling of it for the movie. And it is well worth the watch, AFTER, you read the story however.

 

This was first published on November 27th. I’ve since re-written it to be a bit more focused.

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Random Subjects from Tumblr

*Now that television is getting used to the idea of interracial couples, its time for writers and creators to start moving away from the idea that interracial couples only consist of a white person with a PoC.

Prompted by [a question] about interracial couples in media, and the prevalence of White/PoC couples instead of PoC/PoC couples, I started a list of [Interracial Couples Without White People] in live action television. By the suggestion of an anonymous person, I’m opening three new lists.

Note I: If you send me a couple for the list, please tell me their ethnicity in your message.
Note II: the ethnicities listed below each pairing are those of the actors’, not the characters.
Note III: mixed-race, white passing actors are totally counted as long as they consider themselves non-white, even if the movies whitewashed their characters.

Interracial couples between PoC in movies

  • Hitch/Sara in Hitch.
    (Black American/Mixed Cuban latina)
  • Dom/Lettie in the Fast franchise.
    (Mixed Black/Mixed Dominican&Puerto-Rican latina)
  • Cinderella/Prince Christopher in Cinderella (1997).
    (Black American/Filipino)
  • Trish/Han in Romeo Must Die.
    (Black American/Chinese)
  • Mika/Raizo in Ninja Assassin.
    (Black British/South Korean)
  • Patience/Thomas in Catwoman.
    (Black American/Peruvian Mixed Latino)
  • Alonzo/Sara in Training Day.
    (Black American/ Mixed Cuban latina)
  • Demetrius/Mina in Mississippi Masala.
    (Black American/British Indian)
  • Marcus/Lucia in Our Family Wedding.
    (Black American/Mixed Honduran latina)
  • Ben/Emily in Seven Pounds.
    (Black American/Afro-Cuban&Puerto-Rican latina)
  • Jay/Audrey in Descendants.  
    (Mixed Japanese-Chinese-Korean-Blackfoot American/Mixed race*
    *she might be Afro-latina but she’s really only recently started getting substantial roles so there’s just not much on her)
  • Collins/Angel in Rent.
    (Black American/Puerto-Rican mixed latino)
  • James/Laura in Men In Black II.
    (Black American/Afro-Cuban&Puerto-Rican latina)
  • Adonis/Bianca in Creed.
    (Black American/Afro-Panamanian&Mexican latina)
  • Kay/Robby in The Sapphires.
    (Australian Aboriginal/Black American)
  • Dell/Talia in Larry Crowne.
    (Colombian mixed latino/Black South-African British*
    *they’re a background couple, but still!)
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Keep reading

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*This is a video from Al Jazeera on Japan’s suicide Crisis and how Buddhist Temples (and others) are attempting to combat this issue. 101 East is a series of videos, produced by the Al Jazeera network, covering various social issues across the Asian diaspora. Having had my own bouts with mental illness, the suicide crisis in Japan (and across the world) had always been of specific interest to me. People doing the work of suicide prevention are awesome and truly serving their fellow human beings.

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*So, what we have here are White people, who want to practice a closed ancestral religion, that only exists because of the atrocities that were committed by their ancestors, in the first place. Can I just chime in to say that’s a  horrible fucking idea? I’m not even a proponent of any of these religions and I can see that. And how rude is it to call on the ancestors of the people who once served, died, and were tortured and raped by your ancestors, to attempt to get them to do your bidding? Yeah, go for it if you want to fuck up your whole life and curse your family.

anonymous  asked:

So i was talking to a white witch about Haitan Vodou and they were promoting that white people should be able to practice it, after a long dicussion their conclusion to my points were “i hate white people” and that it’s basically okay to summon the ancestors of oppressed people by the oppressors because “not all white people have oppressive ancestors”

afrocentric-divination  answered:

If those white people have ancestors that weren’t oppressive (which is possible but very unlikely), then there is a chance they came from across the sea on their own and not with Columbus and them, meaning their people came from europe, and there are plenty of religions there. And even if they’re ancestors lived through slavery times and never bought a slave, that still doesn’t give them the right to practice. White people always try to twist things so that it can be ok in their eyes to do whatever they want.

In conclusion, remember white witches, 🗣Just because you contact your ancestors does not mean it is vodou  🗣and 🗣Don’t contact our ancestors, they are not your ancestors, they are ours 🗣

(White witches also forget that our ancestors are petty, they will listen to you and say hi and all that, and then fuck your shit up. Don’t try it)

I’m sorry, I just have to comment like this doesn’t even make fucking sense lol. If you have no connection to our ancestors why are you summoning them? It’s not like Gods & goddesses. They aren’t your gahdamn ancestors. Get over it. Why the fuck do y’all never in your lives develop the capability to understand when things don’t belong to you? It’s elementary school shit. Every other poc practice is mostly okay with each other. Y’all are the ONLY damn ones that always feel the need to insert yourselves where you don’t belong, the rest of us mind our own business or enter a practice the right fucking way. That’s why you’re never welcome.
on top of the damn fact that our ancestry is heavily rooted in slavery perpetrated by YOUR people. Like why do you even WANT to mess with that?

Black ancestors were the ones who hid our gods in their mouths through the horror of the Middle Passage and, when they reached darker, more treacherous shores, they let them out in tiny puffs of air. Prayers here, songs there. Lines scratched into dirt in mud houses, away from prying eyes.

It is Black ancestors who, when white (and other) slave owners tried to crush our gods underfoot, hid them behind a panoply of saints. The halos and the bright robes were bright enough that those slave masters never truly saw the expansive, towering nature of the ones who walked with us. Who still walk with us.

It is Black ancestors who, now that we have shifted into a new era, are coming forth, filled with vigor. Empowered as more of us begin to recall their names or, simply lend them energy by acknowledging their existence. We remember. Ancestors are an outstretched hand to us, one that we can grasp simply by calling upon them. One that we can hold through careful cultivation of our bond.

Like, don’t you understand? Our gods are powerful but so are the ones who came before us. Who built bridges for us upon their whip-scored backs. Whose sacrifice – which in many cases, was their very lives – is what gives us enough air in our lungs to call upon them in the first place. For those of us who remember, it is a source of infinite strength that keeps our backs straight and our heads held high. Our ancestors bring with them the force to make things manifest so that WE don’t get crushed underfoot when wahala comes.

And you, oyinbo witch who thinks of divinities like fruit on trees, ripe for your plucking and consumption, you think you can safely tap into that?

Don’t.

Dip a toe into the ocean of our strength and you’ll get dragged beneath the waves. You don’t want to know what waits for you in the ocean deep.

*And some responses to this:

This shit is wild to me white people are literally continuing oppression in others afterlife?!? Like summoning our ancestors would imply you are looking for exchange or favor or something. Which why would you demand that from black ancestors trying to rest from the terror of living with white folks?!! What. That’s horrible.

afrocentric-divination:

This literally is not about skin color, I don’t understand why you’re purposely being so fucking obtuse about this, @insanewitchking.  Yes, we have common ancestors and shared ground, but you need to remember that some of us have shared ancestors and common ground because of systematic racism, institutional violence, and rape; and in this case, we did not choose to share ancestors or ground with you.  They were either taken from us or forced on us. You don’t get to claim heritage to ground and traditions that you murdered your way into, tried to eradicate, and demonized.  If you need an example, the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, the Trail of Tears, and colonialism as a whole are all good places for you to start.  And if you can’t understand that, then please educate yourself and stay the fuck off posts that don’t fucking pertain to you.

We are not telling you “you can’t practice this because you’re white”, we are saying “do not practice this without going through the proper initiatory channels because you are disrespecting an entire culture, group of people, and spirits otherwise.”  Afro-Diasporic traditions like Vodou, Santeria, Palo Mayombe, etc are closed.  They belong to specific groups of oppressed and marginalized peoples, and understanding the historical and social context of those people is crucial to properly practicing the religion.  Again, see the above paragraph to understand why this is important.

But if you want to be a privileged, disrespectful asshole, and cry your precious White Tears™ because a group of Black people are politely explaining to you that it’s oppressive, inappropriate, and possibly dangerous for you to just randomly start contacting our ancestors, whose oppression you benefit from as a white person, you are the one who isn’t right in this situation.  This is literally why certain religions are closed–to keep ignorant ass clowns like you from interjecting yourself into circles that you’re not a part of.  We’re trying to educate your stupid ass, but if you want to talk over us, and learn the hard way about poking around in shit that you have no business messing with, by all means, tell the ancestors that “We’re all from Africa originally.” and “All Lives Matter” and “All races have done terrible things and we should just all not be racist.” and that “I don’t see color.” and see what fucking happens.

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This photo needs captioning, immediately!

Here! Have some introvert memes! And  please visit the IntrovertUnites website. Its a fun site with lots of information on being an introvert, what it is, how to take care of yourself, how to be in relationships as an introvert, etc.

This is my personal favorite and is highly accurate. (Don’t be calling me out the house after I sit my butt down for the evening.)

We have a twitter here too: https://twitter.com/IntrovertUnite. See some of you there?

 

Yeah, this one is about right, too. I hate small talk, and trying desperately to remember where the hell I know you from.

We have a twitter here too: https://twitter.com/IntrovertUnite. See some of you there?

 

“Meaningless ritualized social interaction” were the exact words I used to refer to “small talk” when I was about fifteen. I have simplified things as I’ve gotten older. Now its just called “mindless yammering”.

We have a twitter here too: https://twitter.com/IntrovertUnite. See some of you there?

 

 

We have a twitter here too: https://twitter.com/IntrovertUnite. See some of you there?

 

We have a twitter here too: https://twitter.com/IntrovertUnite. See some of you there?

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And just to lighten things up a bit, here’s some Chadwick Bozeman, my future  ex-husband: